Based in Los Angeles, Reiss is known for her public art installations and large-scale murals that have graced alleyways, abandoned buildings, forests, bookstores, and galleries around the world.

Growing up artsy in a quiet suburb of Colorado, Reiss never quite fit in. Her gut told her she was destined for something bigger, so she relocated to San Francisco in an era when the city was still a hub for guerilla art. There, she received her MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and spent almost two decades enjoying what she calls a “creative incubation,” quite literally painting the town with artists drawn to the same medium.

Influenced by her Eastern European heritage, Reiss puts a psychedelic twist on traditional Polish and Russian folk art. While murals make up the bulk of her work, she has also worked with textiles to create her signature installation experiences, while also deepening her practice on a much smaller scale with delicate paintings, sketches, and tattoo designs. There’s a certain adolescent innocence captured by her aesthetic which is juxtaposed by her technical virtuosity, allowing her to depict inviting scenes of flora and fauna in ways that can only be described as magical.  

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet muralist, Bunnie Reiss.

What is the first creative project you remember?

One of my very first public murals was in the amazing Clarion Alley. It was around 1999-2000, and things were fantastic in The Mission. So much creative force coming out of just a few blocks in San Francisco. It was an amazing time and I painted a very small wall that took me so many days. I laugh now when I think about how long it took. I wanted it to be perfect. I painted a huge portrait of a cat toy from the 1950s. It’s still one of my favorite murals. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Folk, psychedelic, cosmic.

Mural by Bunnie Reiss in Detroit, MI.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

My friends and I worked on a free carnival called Peralta Junction in Oakland, CA. We rented a vacant lot for 3 months and built a series of games, booths, stages, etc. I was in charge of the stage and it was incredible to make something so big and beautiful. It was one of the last projects our loose collective did before we sort of grew up and moved in different directions. It was by far one of the most ambitious, with so many hands and personalities involved. I loved it and still think of it often.  

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Getting my MFA in painting was one of the harder experiences I’ve had. I was very isolated and so busy with both studio and critical reading and writing. It taught me so many lessons, but most importantly how to defend my work and speak effectively in a way where I am actually heard. It was a great lesson in understanding myself, especially as a female in higher education. 

A bespoke buffalo and flowers mural by Bunnie Reiss that speaks to her Colorado roots.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think it’s a little bit of both. It just comes down to really doing what you want in this world and being honest about that work.

What’s the last dream you had?

I had a daydream about growing an orchard of olive trees on my desert property. I could almost feel the shade from them. I hope it becomes a reality. 

Big or small canvases, Reiss finds creative surfaces to bring her signature work to life.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I want to be remembered as a kind, honest woman who worked hard and loved the world.

Follow @Bunnie on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

You’re not dreaming—you’re just looking at one of Valentin Pavageau’s hypnotic compositions that blend illustration and graphic design into mesmerizing digital renderings.

Pavageau studied art at Atelier Guist’hau-Rollin in Nantes, France, an education that easily could have pushed him towards a more traditional aesthetic. Instead, he drew inspiration from the canonical figures he studied—surrealists such as Salvador Dalí, for example—then leveraged these influences as a jumping off point from which to push the boundaries of distortion, defining a style all his own.

Pavageau’s digital collages are filled with bold geometric patterns and vibrant color schemes that play with perspective and guide the eye. His emphasis on lighting along with the addition of an occasional, solitary character lends each piece a narrative, a nod to his fascination with film. By incorporating intense, repetitive lines and shadows, Pavageau creates an illusion of movement, stimulating a seductively dizzying experience for the viewer—a trance you’ll never want to snap out of. 

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet Valentin Pavageau.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I think it was a small series of adventurous comic books I started to draw when I was five (full of adventure and sci-fi, if I remember well). The story centered around a character named Lapa, which can be translated as “no have.” This amused my parents because he didn’t possess a nose nor ears, but this was a pure coincidence: a plain smiley face was just way more convenient to draw. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Minimalistic, surrealistic, psychedelic.

‘Panorama’ by Valentin Pavageau.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

A quite recent one where I had to create a poster for an upcoming VR show. It had to be one image that summed up different scenes, different stories. It was a bit of a challenge as I usually try to focus on one central element and keep my pieces as minimalistic as possible, but it was a great experience.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I can’t think of one in particular, but I’d say every commissioned work that has unusual constraints teaches me something new or takes me out of my comfort zone. Every project teaches me that I tend to underestimate the time I need to reach what I want… 

‘Traffic Light’ by Valentin Pavageau.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I’d say I was born with it, but like many other fields, it still requires a lot of practice. I had periods of time, sometimes years, when I didn’t create anything, and I felt my appetite and skills almost disappear. I believe it is important to practice your craft on a regular basis to keep the mind fresh and open to new influences. Emulation can have great effects, too. 

‘Mausoleum’ by Valentim Pavageau.

What’s the last dream you had?

I had a bunch of weird dreams recently. In one, my roommate, who has been taking drawing lessons in real life, came home with countless incredible new pieces of art and I was really jealous. I don’t know what a psychoanalyst would do with this, but I don’t want to know. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

If there’s any trace at all of my work in a hundred years, I would be glad! And more specifically, I hope it stands the test of time and remains mysterious and evocative.

Follow @ValentinPavageau on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Bigger isn’t always better, but standing beside one of Belgium native Michael Benisty’s gigantic, metal-cast sculptures, one starts to wonder whether it might be. 

Each of Benisty’s sculptures begins with a 3D rendering that allows him to further develop the imaginative world in which each sculpture exists and expand the possibilities of how his work can be shared. Benisty’s sculptures and digital works explore themes of submission, romance, and enlightenment. His artistic goal is to encourage a dialogue among viewers, to incite a response, and above all else, to promote self-discovery. 

On a technical level, Benisty brings an exquisite softness to his enormous, stainless steel figures, like the delicately draped fabric that envelops his 21-foot masterpiece, “Surrender,” or the windswept cords that form “Agaue,” a 16-foot gold-plated face. With his most recognizable creations measuring in at these larger-than-life dimensions, Benisty strives to create art that will not only make you look up, but more importantly, look inward.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

“Surrender,” a 21-foot stainless steel piece by Benisty. 

What is the first creative project you remember?

It is difficult to remember the very first creative project since I have been on a creative journey for the past 25 years. But the first that comes to mind when looking back was my first digital art series I created to awaken and provoke a questioning of the world’s current state of affairs. I focused on international, social, and political issues that I witnessed while traveling extensively around the world, a series that juxtaposed images of East and West, military might and spirituality, power and hopelessness.   

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

My aesthetic has evolved over time throughout the evolution of my work, tapping into different mediums and themes, refining itself over time to where it’s at now. If I could describe it in three words, it would be meaningful, beautiful, and experimental.

“Broken But Together” is a 21-foot sculpture made of mirror polished stainless steel, created by Michael Benisty. 

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Each new collaboration presents different challenges, but my first large-scale sculpture in collaboration with Swarovski was a very fulfilling experience for me as I learned a lot along the way. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Each new project teaches me something new about myself. 

“Agaue,” a 16-foot gold plated polished stainless steel piece by Benisty.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think we all have creativity in us, but it definitely takes time and effort to mold your vision. 

What’s the last dream you had?

The last dream I had is the one I am currently working on building. 

“Mirage” is a 16-foot sculpture created by Michael Benisty. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I cannot think that far ahead, but what I have experienced over the course of my career is that art is built only to be shared. And the real reward, to me, lies in the experience that others live through and share with me.

Follow @MichaelBenisty on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

It’s the early 2000s in Brooklyn, New York and teenage Tyra Myricks is locked in her room, grounded for sneaking off to purchase designer clothes. Instead of wasting any time considering what she’d done wrong, she decides to pour her creative energy into dreaming up her own clothing line. Fast forward a decade, and Myricks had launched WEALTH (formerly known as FLIGHT NYC), a streetwear brand sported by celebrities around the globe.

As the daughter of Run DMC’s Jam Master Jay, Myricks grew up immersed in the music industry—an upbringing that shaped her career at the intersection of music and fashion. As the former Director of Design and Merchandising & Development at OVO, rapper Drake’s lifestyle brand, Myricks curated designs for all stores in North America, Canada, England and Japan, while also managing tour merchandise for artists PartyNextDoor, DVSN, and Drake himself.

Some of Myricks’ other business ventures include co-founding Method Gym, the first Black-owned gym in downtown Los Angeles, and Juicy Pizza, an L.A eatery commemorating Biggie Smalls in partnership with his daughter, T’yanna Wallace. Between projects, Myricks pursues her passion for giving back, creating opportunities for Black creatives by providing resources to help grow minority-owned businesses. In addition, Myricks is the co-founder of EntreprHERneur, a platform that focuses on the mental health of female entrepreneurs, shining a light on the obstacles faced by women in business, and creating a space for them to succeed. That’s how she stays grounded, which if you ask us, beats being grounded any day.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet Tyra Myricks, serial entrepreneur and designer.

What is the first creative project you remember?

My creative projects go back to grade school. I didn’t want anyone else in class to be smarter or more creative than I was, so I went above and beyond. In fourth grade, we had to give an oral presentation on a Native American tribe of our choice. I made headdresses for my entire group out of feathers and construction paper and our group got over 100%. That wasn’t the first time I was creative on a school project, but it’s the first time I initiated something when it wasn’t a part of the instructions. I felt like a trendsetter, an overachiever, and it felt amazing. I wanted to feel that feeling so much more in life.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Comfortable, unparalleled, thought-provoking.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

The most fulfilling collaboration I have worked on is OVO x BAPE. BAPE has always been one of my favorite brands. In high school, I would actually get in trouble for sneaking to the BAPE store and buying things several times a week. When I got caught, my mother grounded me, but she also asked me, “Why do you pay so much for designer when people can pay you to wear your name? You hustling backwards and most of those brands don’t care about people that look like us.” I started my clothing line while on punishment with those words ringing in my head as I stared at my bedroom walls after school. So, to go from BAPE being one of the reasons I started my brand to working on a collaboration with them was super fulfilling. 

OHGEESY for OVO x BAPE campaign.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Each project teaches me something different. Whether it’s something simple like discovering my range or something as minuscule as being able to stay up and function for 72 hours without sleep and still meet a deadline with an impeccable finished product. Life is our greatest teacher, and when you spend your life executing your passion, you constantly learn new things about yourself. It’s all about slowing down momentarily to see the lesson or your abilities you weren’t aware of. 

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I believe creativity is hereditary. Both of my parents were extremely creative, however if I hadn’t been encouraged to express myself creatively as a child, I don’t think I would be where I am today. Creativity is in us all, something or someone just has to bring it out of us. 

Behind the scenes with Tyra Myricks.

What’s the last dream you had?

The last dream I had was a nightmare: I got caught cheating. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I know it’s sort of inevitable but I don’t want my work to be written about. Stories get misconstrued, misinterpreted, and watered down with time. I want my work, projects, businesses and legacy to speak for itself on a Banksy, Basquiat, Picasso, Dalí level, but digitally. When we see an artist we know their story without reading a book. Don’t put my story on pages, recreate it in murals, album covers, concert sets, reuse and recycle pieces of my story to create infinite art and creativity.

Follow @TyraMyricks on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

For distinguished guests, we like to roll out the red carpet. For textile artist Trish Andersen, it’s more fitting to roll out one of the intricately textured, multicolored, kaleidoscopic creations she’s famous for. Hailing from Dalton, Georgia, the so-called “carpet capital of the world,” Andersen—armed with a tufting gun, which allows her to paint with yarn—creates enticingly plush pieces that tempt you to toss etiquette to the wind and touch the art.

Upon graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design, Andersen spent a decade working in Brooklyn, where she ran a studio that fabricated custom environments for events and photoshoots. In search of a change of pace and a more authentic version of herself, she landed back in Savannah, Georgia, shifting away from commercial work in order to develop her personal artistic practice and reconnect with her roots. Enter the tufting gun.

When creating, Andersen reaches for fibers gathered from flora, fauna, and the factory floor to strike her unique balance between ordered and anarchic, vibrant and muted. Energized by color, her palettes are born out of spontaneity, while her intertwining designs are often planned using programs like Procreate. By playing with pile heights and cutting techniques, Andersen brings her splashy aesthetic to everything from large-scale wall art to sculptures and installations, and even directly into your home with her signature rugs and shag mats. 

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet textile artist, Trish Andersen.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I was diagnosed with Leukemia when I was two years old. My first memory of making/creating was at the clinic. It’s no wonder why I still create to heal and process the world around me!

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Colorful, textured, soft.

Ebb and Flow by Trish Andersen.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

There have been many, but I would have to say a large scale piece I did for the lobby of the Peeples Cancer Institute. It was very cool to be able to create something that could help people go through something I too have experienced. 

Another would be my rug collaboration with Shaw Contract rugs; after all, I grew up in the carpet capital of the world. No matter where I was in the country, whenever I’d see a Shaw carpet truck driving down the highway it would remind me of home. I had no clue my life would circle back to a focus on yarn and carpet making. It was a real honor to get to work with this incredible company. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I was commissioned to create a piece for the launch of Coca-Cola’s new flavor, Georgia Peach. They were looking to commission an artist from Georgia, and that’s where I grew up. When I received the call, I was actually driving down the highway in a box truck, moving my studio from NYC to Georgia. Only moments prior to the call, I was thinking about how crazy I was for making such a move. It was the sign I needed and reminded me to trust my gut and trust the process.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think everyone is creative. I see creativity as problem solving, and that can be done in so many different ways.

Connection Reflection by Trish Andersen.

What’s the last dream you had?

I’m constantly having dreams where I discover there’s a whole new wing of my house or studio. I’m always so excited in the dream, but a little defeated when I wake up.

A behind the scenes look at Trish Andersen’s studio.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

Ha! I’d be shocked if they are still talking about it. But I guess, “looks like she had fun!”

Follow @TrishAndersen on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

If only we could see the world through Nicole McLaughlin’s eyes, we’d see slippers where others see volleyballs and raincoats arranging themselves from a pile of discarded bubble wrap. Since leaving her day job as a graphic designer in 2018 and turning her upcycling passion into a career in sustainable fashion design, this young creative has been getting a lot of well-earned recognition for her wildly imaginative work, collaborating with the likes of Puma and Arc’teryx. Through her whimsical approach to repurposing everyday materials McLaughlin challenges our perception of waste and promotes sustainability in a way that feels anything but preachy.

But creating is only half the story for Nicole McLaughlin, who spends much of her time and energy educating the public, hosting global workshops on the artistic and functional potential of everyday items. Looking ahead, McLaughlin hopes to launch a summer program concentrating on skill-based learning, teaching students not only the “what” but also the “how” and “why” behind sustainable design. 

McLaughlin is currently developing a non-profit organization that will provide design resources to young artists. The organization will help large companies donate their dead stock and overstock materials to schools and universities in need, repurposing these resources for the classroom. With the crisis of climate change looming ever larger, it’ll take imaginations as big as McLaughlin’s to save the day. And thanks to her, being proactive has never looked better. 

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet Nicole McLaughlin, the artist who uses unexpected translations of materials to uniquely highlight the message of sustainability.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I’ve always had an entrepreneurial spirit. My first creative project had one goal: earning enough money to buy candy. So, I did whatever I could to make a dollar. In elementary school, I made Barbie clothes— they weren’t very good, but they sold. In 5th grade, I also started a massage business where I charged fifty cents to a dollar to give what I can only describe as aggressive high-fives and punches disguised as “therapeutic.” Nothing was relaxing about them.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Comfortable, functional, fun.

A piece inspired by phone chargers by Nicole McLaughlin.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I’m grateful for the collaborations I’ve already done, but I’m equally looking forward to the ones that I have yet to do and the new challenges they’ll pose. I’m excited about my partnership with Arc’teryx and the long-lasting impact we can create by focusing on circularity, upcycling, and full-scale sustainability. I’ve also raised money for several charities through collaborations with brands such as JanSport, Puma, and various personal projects.

JanShorts by Nicole McLaughlin. McLaughlin has partnered with JanSport to raise money for causes and to raise awareness.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I’ve learned something from every single project but the volleyball shoe was a real breakthrough moment. It broke down barriers in my creative thinking and opened up a whole new world. It removed the word “no” from my vocabulary when creating.

Volleyball shoes by Nicole McLaughlin.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think we’re born with a sense of wonder and curiosity and the type of creativity that develops depends on whether it’s nurtured or cast aside. Creativity doesn’t necessarily mean being a designer or an artist; it’s how you view things and apply your way of thinking to any aspect of your life.

What’s the last dream you had?

One of the strangest things I’ve dreamt about was that I was a political speechwriter for a famous rapper who was running for governor. It was bizarre. At one point, I think he wanted to be president and we argued about how much of my time they needed for actual speech writing.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

In 100 years from now, I hope people are living a better life grounded in positive change. I hope that society will have learned from past mistakes. Fingers crossed we haven’t totally f-ed up.

If there’s any impact, any legacy of my work, I hope I’ll have inspired people to view waste as a tool to create fun designs rather than a burden.

Follow @NicoleMcLaughlin on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

If you’ve shuffled through Spotify’s RapCaviar playlist or perused the app’s recap of your year in music, you’re already familiar with the vibrant work of Erik Herrström. As the former Brand Design Director at Spotify, Herrström spearheaded design for everything from brand identity projects and campaigns to interactive experiences, installations, and photo shoots. After a decade of working in New York City, Herrström is now an independent designer and art director living in Vienna, Austria.

Born in Sweden, Herrström got his start experimenting with interactive designs and building websites for small businesses during his teenage years—developing the practical skills that eventually helped land his first full-time design job. Herrström’s background in interactive design lends his work a sense of dynamism, bringing immersive, interactive experiences to life. Herrström’s body of work is diverse, ranging from redesigning digital ecosystems and creating an installation in the NYC subway system to crafting brand identities for emerging artists. 

Before Spotify, Herrström worked at renowned agencies such as R/GA and Stink Studios in New York City. There, he created designs for Nike, Google, Facebook, Twitter, Airbnb, Youtube and Coca-Cola, winning over one hundred industry awards and receiving write ups from the likes of Fast Company, Creative Review, Billboard and Wired. From his homebase in Vienna, Herrström continues to drive culture and design forward with his vivid, hyper-saturated aesthetic.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet award-winning design director, Erik Herrström.

What is the first creative project you remember? 

Playdough creations in kindergarten. Apparently, I intentionally destroyed them on the car ride home from school that day. It seems I wasn’t too precious about my art from an early age. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words. 

Bold. Colorful. Systematic. 

Herrström’s colorful identity system developed for Spotify’s New Music Friday.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on? 

That would have to be the Spotify Wrapped campaign we created in 2018. It was a huge internal team effort at Spotify together with our external partners. Our goal was to use all 30 colors present in the Spotify color palette in this one campaign. We also used live image color analyses of artists’ images and artworks to define the color schemes. Every listener’s summary was therefore unique, not only in content, but also in imagery. 

For 2018 year’s campaign Herrström defined the design system and early on pitched the idea of live image color analyzation to define color schemes. Produced in 2018 at Spotify, New York. Full credits on erikherrstrom.com.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself? 

The massive David Bowie installation Spotify created for the Broadway-Lafayette subway station in SoHo, New York. After years of living in the city and using the subway system every day, it was special to be part of creating something unique there. We used unexpected ad placements to fully transform the station, decorating it in ways I never thought were possible: staircases, beams in the ceiling, and even Metrocards became our canvases. It was a bit surreal and made me understand that anything is possible when the right ideas are there. I led the design of this project and am still in awe of the innovative ideas the creative team came up with.

Herrström’s work on ‘David Bowie is Here’ took over all of the Broadway-Lafayette subway station, featuring over 40 unique pieces about the music icon’s life in the neighborhood and New York City.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught? 

All humans are creative in their own ways, but at the end of the day, it may come down to how our society defines creativity.

What’s the last dream you had?

My dreams have mostly been about traveling lately. Last night, I dreamt I was on a road trip in Tuscany. I suppose I’m looking forward to some trips in real life when it’s safe to do so again. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I hope my career will have helped drive culture and design forward. Hopefully, some of my work can serve as references for someone in the future.

Follow @Herrstrom on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

David Stenbeck is a digital artist whose ethereal, three-dimensional renderings have a decidedly hyper-real, almost alien quality. A self-proclaimed “spiritual misleader” living in Helsingborg, Sweden, Stenbeck is also a former published poet, editor, and literary critic, which explains the tongue-in-cheek wordplay you’ll find in many of his images. 

His surreal artwork has been featured in outlets as varied as Glamour and Cosmopolitan, the SCOPE International Contemporary Art Show in Miami, as well as on the cover of “Stranger Things” actor Dacre Montgomery’s recently published book of poems, DKMH. Stenbeck has also created work for Apple Music and Bumble, among other top brands. 

To create his dreamlike, often playful images, Stenbeck uses the three-dimensional modeling software Cinema 4D, combining cinematic images of natural landscapes with neon and lasers in a way that feels almost like science fiction. Despite the otherworldly nature of his work, however, Stenbeck’s images feel decidedly grounded in the contemporary. In one composition, a book titled, “Cancelled Dates During COVID-19, vol. 1” sits next to a bottle of wine; in another, the text, “Might Delete Later” hovers over a dark forest, casting the surrounding trees in a beguiling neon glow. 

You can check out his latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet Swedish digital artist, David Stenbeck. Photography credit: Johanna Stenbeck.

What is the first creative project you remember?

When I was eight or nine, I built a kiosk out of expensive, green paper sheets during a break in school. When the teacher came back to the classroom, she wasn’t too happy that I’d made it life-sized as opposed to the miniature version she had imagined when we discussed its realization. But that’s typically me: a baroque approach.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

I don’t know, neon-classical… perhaps.

Jesolo Cloud (2019) by David Stenbeck, courtesy of Jenn Singer Gallery.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Together with a Sino-German 3D-scanner brand, I’m making digital sculptures with the intention to eventually cast larger, physical versions. To say I’m enthusiastic about these kinds of hybrid concepts is an understatement. They leave me feeling connected to various historical artistic ‘isms’ and expressions.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

The above mentioned one: I can now be Bernini if I want.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with or something you’re taught?

It’s in your DNA. That being said, you need the right environment to allow any output. We’re mostly guided by chance and we end up wherever convenience steers us.

H-2-OH (2019) by David Stenbeck, courtesy of Jenn Singer Gallery.

What’s the last dream you had?

I dreamt of a raging contemporary street adventure, almost Hieronymus Bosch-like in plentitude, bejeweled with synthetic drugs and deep regrets.

I Miss the Future (2020) by David Stenbeck, courtesy of Jenn Singer Gallery.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

That is absolutely not for me to speculate about!

Follow @dovneon on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Dami Adebayo is a Nigerian visual artist and art director based in New York City. His work embodies a surreal and conceptual aesthetic, bringing different individual elements in nature together with objects in our environment. This collision of organic imagery and cosmic composition can rally the contradictory conditions of a dream or transform an alternate reality into absolute reality. 

The result is a visual mind-meld that riffs on technology, high fashion, and science fiction. Adebayo would call it the “magic of the creative mind.” 

His unique eye for visual idealization has earned him clients like Harper’s Bazaar, Coca-Cola, Sprayground, Universal Pictures, Warner Bros., Paramount Pictures, and U.S. Open. 

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here. 

Meet Dami Adebayo, also known as @WeirdCreative.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I remember drawing stick-like action comics in middle school and then folding the paper into small booklets to sell to the older kids, lol. We weren’t allowed to use ink pens at that age, just pencils, so using ink pens to draw was like the first out-of-the-box thing I did.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Weird, creative, fun.

“Second Coming” by Weird Creative.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Working on a project with Harper’s Bazaar and seeing my work published on two full pages was something I wasn’t expecting to have as a visual artist—especially in a fashion magazine.

“African Intelligence” by Weird Creative.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

A personal 3D project I worked on. For years, I was nonchalant about adding more creative knowledge to what I already have. But during the pandemic, I took it upon myself to learn and dedicate my time to the art. [It] made me realize learning is a lifelong process and also a reminder that there are endless possibilities of using other mediums to express art.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I would say both. I believe we are born with some sort of creative tendencies. However, I was also fortunate to grow up around creative people. My dad was an architect so I remember seeing complex drawings, shapes and drawing materials everywhere.

Digital artwork for Cardi B’s website landing page. Art direction by Weird Creative.

What’s the last dream you had?

I was on a road trip when I stopped at this small town and everyone I knew was in this town and having a good time.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

Wow, that’s the year 2121… [I hope] to be remembered as a humble, exceptional artist who had a unique eye for the world around him and heavily inspired a generation of creatives during his era.

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This #Pride, we were truly proud to showcase the incredible array of talented LGBTQIA+ creators on our platform and beyond, including Elizabeth Wirija. 

Elizabeth “Eli” Wirija is a photographer and director born and raised in Jakarta, Indonesia and currently based in New York. Pointing their lens in the direction of unapologetic truth and beauty, they are known for their keen ability to document and create rarefied worlds. 

Wirija picked up their first camera at age 15. After obtaining a B.F.A from School of Visual Arts, the graphic design major started freelancing for ad agencies but found photography more liberating and restorative. 

“At first, it was more nature and landscape-based, but I found that my true joy is photographing portraits. I always feel very grateful when someone trusts me to photograph them as it is a vulnerable process,” they told American Influencer Council.

Wirija documents narratives that inspire others and make the viewer feel something genuine, carrying a new story in every frame. Their work spans different avenues of the industry, from editorial, to documentary and commercial. Most recently, they photographed and directed a Pride campaign with Bob the Drag Queen for Coach. 

Other clients include Nike, Vice, Adidas Originals, WNBA, Atlantic Records, Microsoft, SSENSE, ASOS, Make Up For Ever and Barney’s New York. Their work has been published in British Vogue, Billboard, Vanity Fair, FADER, Refinery29, Fast Company, Paper, and Nylon.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.  

Meet Indonesian director and photographer, Elizabeth Wirija.

What is the first creative project you remember?

Drawing whatever I imagined and coloring outside the lines. I used to draw on the walls and I would get in trouble. When I first picked up a camera, I was mesmerized. I remember vividly observing the world with a new set of eyes. When I was 14, I had a friend in high school who was making music at the time and creating bootleg CDs with his music on it, so we decided to make an album cover where we would print it out at the recreation center and fold it into the plastic CD cover with a tracklist and everything. We styled him in this colorful outfit and went around school at different locations and photographed him. It was so exciting and I remember sharing tons of laughter when I look back on the images. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Experimental. Freedom. Fun.

A campaign for Carrots x Footlocker, photographed by Wirija.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I have had the absolute honor of working with such great talent over the years and I appreciate every single collaboration as it takes trust, energy and passion to create something magical. One of the most fulfilling collaborations I’ve worked on is a story I photographed for an up-and-coming contemporary Indonesian magazine called Pears Mag that is due to be released this summer. It was documenting individuals with “unconventional” bodies who have altered their bodies to make it feel more like home. I found it was such a vulnerable process for each person to open up to me and tell me about their experience, whether it be top surgery, hormone replacement therapy or even heavy tattoos and piercings. The power to change our physical vessel to align more with the image of our soul or how we perceive ourselves is amazing to me.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Each project has taught me something about myself as I continue to expand and evolve. It is a splice of my future self embedded in the work that I slowly unveil. One project this year that reminded me of something I hold dear is the Carrots x Footlocker campaign lookbook I did. I got to build this narrative of kids ruling the world where adults don’t exist. There are no rules, there is freedom to be and create. It was cool to embody this through how they decorated their rooms or even at the dinner table, being able to play with your food and make these insane food sculptures. I revere the good memories of my childhood and this solidified the idea that I need to constantly take care of my inner child because that’s where my imagination comes from. That’s where all the wild ideas are stored, and that spirit of not giving a fuck and just doing stuff because it sounds fun is the best way to approach things.  

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

Creativity is a sense of awareness. How we as humans exist in this world is ultimately creative, if you ponder on it. In some ways, it is also a sensitivity. My sensitivity is the ability to observe what’s around me, then interpreting it through an abstract embodiment. There is an inherent baseline of creativity that lays dormant in every person, until we find forms or mediums to express it. It doesn’t have to be complicated, as the word itself means finding unconventional ways to solve dilemmas. In my mind, everyone possesses the seed of imagination, it is only a question of who will nurture it with the necessary exposure to sunlight (stimuli) and water. Some will let it stay the size of a sapling while others will take care of it sweetly until it blooms.  

Wirija captured this image of model Symone Lu for Vogue.

What’s the last dream you had?

The last one was kissing my crush (aha) and holding hands in a dimension that was so beautiful, it’s really difficult to explain. Although not the last dream I had, another one that is always implanted in my cognition is the time I lucid dreamed and was flying over a city that is a mix of old Manhattan and a new world. The grid system was very apparent; I didn’t have to avoid any buildings in the way because I had a way of passing through like I was a transparent spirit. The feeling that flying gave me was the highest form of freedom, I felt so detached to the physical with no worries holding me down–just the wind blowing in my face and this overwhelming emotion of lightlessness. 

An editorial moment captured by Wirija.   

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I’ll be down to come back as a hologram once every other 100 years for a short 10 minute visit to communicate and connect with the new generation and project some of my life’s work. I hope that people can take a moment to stay in their present and appreciate my art, wonder at the beauty, and initiate some joy. 

I don’t need my art to immortalize me anymore, I used to desire it strongly but to me, after the realization that energy can never be destroyed, I’m more focused on how I make people feel in this current realm more than anything.   

Follow @e_wirija on Creatively] 

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life