Watch Making Your Portfolio Stand Out with Canva, featuring DonYé Taylor and Dani State.

A workshop on how to create a portfolio that gets you noticed and earns you a dream job, featuring consultant and creative strategist DonYé Taylor, joined by Canva’s Design Recruiter, Dani State.

“When creating your portfolio, try to really communicate the impact and the value that your art has.”

DonYé Taylor, Consultant and Creative Strategist

In celebration of #Pride Month, we’re spotlighting LGBTQIA+ creators who champion queer visibility through their creative work—like viral content creator, actress, and comedian, Nicole Bloomgarden.

Nicole’s signature content delivers quick-witted sarcasm in a nonchalant tone that embodies her triple-Taurus placements. Her creation of Travis Scott’s “Out West” challenge in 2019 put her on the map, resulting in millions of views as countless TikTokers and celebrities replicated her choreography. The viral trend ultimately resulted in a Fortnite collaboration, as the winner of their Emote Royale Contest. Nicole’s work has also been recognized by The Washington Post, Complex and Insider for her activism and contribution in giving black creators such as herself the credit they deserve.

In addition to going viral and growing her audience, Nicole has partnered with several brands like American Eagle, Snapchat, Ruffles, and more. Recently, she made her debut acting as Giana Carter in Amazon Prime’s “Intentions.” Nicole continues to actively pursue her career as an actress and influencer, positively impacting many online users along the way.

You can check out more of Nicole’s work on Creatively and @hellocreatively on Instagram.

Meet Viral Content Creator, Actress and Comedian, Nicole Bloomgarden.

What is the first creative project you remember?

When I was 9 or 10 I went door-to-door handing out flyers that I made by hand telling all the neighborhood kids that I was performing a show in my front yard that night. When all my friends came, I would point to people in the audience of 5 and tell them to give me a scenario to act out. I had them laughing all night—my first memory of wanting to be an entertainer.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Effortless. Relatable. Comfortable.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

My collaboration with Fortnite was the most fulfilling collaboration I have endured thus far. I think this collaboration was so impactful because it gave me a taste at what I was capable of. The second you start truly believing you can do something is when things start happening; this collaboration opened up mental blockades of self doubt and allowed me to start digging deep and reach my full creative potential. To have created something in my childhood home during a pandemic that caught the attention of millions around the world, and then eventually one of the most popular video games in the world, was life changing.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I believe you start to tap into your creativity when you start to care less about what people think of you and listen to your own heart more and what fills it up. Basically, the more you start living with your soul instead of your ego the more creative you’ll be, which is why I think creativity can be developed.

What do you know now that you wish you knew at the start of your career?

I know this is crazy, but truly nothing. I had to start naive and learn, it was all part of the process. What I do know now is I THANK my mom for forcing me to keep it PG because a digital footprint is so real! People still send me content I posted from YEARS ago.

How do you cultivate strong relationships with clients?

Stay genuine and honest. I think people take professionalism too seriously and start to lose their sense of self. You can be professional and respectful without having to lose your personality. Being your true self confidently and unapologetically will be contagious for whoever you’re working with and they will naturally start to do the same I’ve found.

7. One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I want people to talk about how I stayed true to myself and my work. I made art that spoke to me and what I liked. I want people to talk about how through being unapologetically myself I inspired others to be more themselves. Me loving every aspect of myself helped others do the same.

Follow @NicoleBloomgarden on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective.

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

In celebration of AAPI month, we’re thrilled to spotlight Australian-born, LA-based chef and food stylist, Sandy Ho—an artist in the kitchen with a passport full of flavors.

Sandy’s cultural roots and unique experiences combine to bring a splash of color and Vietnamese nostalgia to the culinary scene. Initially on a path to become an artist, Sandy found that her creativity was meant for the kitchen as a result of working in restaurants to pay for art supplies. Inspired by a childhood spent in the kitchen with family—wrapping, rolling, cooking and eating together—she spent the initial years post-graduation mastering the culinary arts in Melbourne. From there, she embarked on a globe-trotting journey, curating one-of-a-kind food experiences for guests across Italy, Croatia, the British Virgin Islands, Sardinia, Greece, and Thailand. The experience gave her a deep appreciation for local farmers and the seasonality of ingredients.

Upon landing in Los Angeles, she launched Sandita’s—a creative, monthly dinner series where each meal is a testament to her ethos of fostering positivity through shared flavors and meals. Since then, Sandy has been working closely with brands and chefs to help bring their food experience to life with signature events, pop ups and unique food styling.

You can check out more of Sandy’s work on Creatively and @hellocreatively on Instagram.

Meet Chef and Food Stylist, Sandy Ho.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I have always loved diving into my imagination and using colors and patterns and light. Even as a child, I would cut and reshape my mothers clothing very much to her dismay, I would draw and paint abstract imaginings on leaves and on the back of my dad’s work papers and always found myself in the kitchen with my family playing with different colored herbs and vegetables like toys.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Whimsical. Bold. Gentle.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Cultured Magazine Art Basel Dinner in 2021, I loved working with Sarah and Rebecca. And they allowed me to really go the distance with my creativity on the dishes.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think it’s both! You have to want to tap into that side of yourself and of course, the world around you and the company you keep will always continue to shape how you voice your creativity.

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What do you know now that you wish you knew at the start of your career?

That I will always make the right decision if the decision is for myself 🙂

How do you cultivate strong relationships with clients?

Listen, listen, listen! And be brave enough to share your expertise in a kind and open way.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

Sandy’s work was a fully-committed, honest re-telling of her life and all the colors she experienced along the way.

Follow @sandyho on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective.

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Introducing CreativelyMade winner Sahron Amir Barkley!

Every month, CreativelyMade gives away $5,000 in cash, plus exclusive prizes from partners, to celebrate the amazing work of a creative on Creatively. Meet April’s winner, fashion stylist Sahron Amir Barkley!

Sahron is a freelance editorial fashion stylist and creative director whose process is marked by a balance of inspiration, research, and dynamic styling that blends feminine & masculine details.

“When I’m inspired, research is my best friend. It adds deeper layers to what started as a moment of inspiration. Once the moment is fully developed, my favorite part is styling. I love utilizing varying textures, vibrant colors, and juxtaposing prints.”

Sahron has a B.S. in Fashion Merchandising & Management from Philadelphia University and a M.S. in Fashion Design Management from Politecnico di Milano in Milan. Their work has been featured in Vogue, Selin, Kaltblut & more.

Sahron is also the CEO and founder of Swank Apparel Co., a unisex line of contemporary, elevated casual wear. The CreativelyMade grant will help Sahron “to further [their] creative network and opportunities for exhibitions, showcases, magazine and brand partnerships.” We can’t wait to see what they do next!

Follow Sahron Amir Barkley on #Creatively and share your work for a chance to be next month’s #CreativelyMade winner!

Introducing Taylor Hawkins—a model and content creator with a passion for storytelling, both in front of and behind the camera. With a focus on fashion, Taylor’s content showcases her unique eye for editing, styling, and photography. She endeavors to inspire others through her authentic self-expression and transparency about her journey along the way.

Born in Philadelphia and raised in South Jersey, Taylor Hawkins moved to New York after graduating from Rutgers University with a Bachelor’s in Public Policy and Africana Studies. Since then, Taylor has worked with Black-owned brands like Danessa Myricks Beauty and Fashion Fair Cosmetics, appearing in Sephora stores nationwide. She’s also graced the cover of CRWN Magazine, walked several runways—including Sergio Hudson, Studio 189, Alliette, and House of Aama, and co-directed a project featured in Vogue Italia shot by Sydney Claire. In addition to these achievements, Taylor has also created content with brands like H&M, Marc Jacobs, and Fenty Beauty. Her recent creative endeavors include founding BRWNSTU, a workshop centered on networking and collaboration, and taking the lead next to Burna Boy in his latest video.

You can check out more of Taylor Hawkins’ work here on Creatively and @hellocreatively on Instagram.

Meet model and digital creator, Taylor Hawkins.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I was about 13 years old when my mom enrolled me in TLC, which was essentially a modeling bootcamp with a heavy emphasis on charm. They stressed that models should also be role models, and it felt like a real sisterhood. The first creative project I remember was doing a fashion show in the church basement where the camp would sometimes take place. We each brought a suitcase full of pieces and decked ourselves out!

That show is really a core memory for me, because I remember experiencing tunnel vision—all I saw was the light at the end of our makeshift runway; everything else was just shadows, or figures. That project also influenced how I create. I‘ve always had to have hands in the creative direction; I couldn’t just model, I had to style myself, scout the location, create the moodboard, etc. That one moment showed me that I could take nothing, and make it into something. And for years to come, I would do just that to build my portfolio.

Describe your aesthetic in 3 words.

Provocative. Eclectic. Regal.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Recently, I collaborated with a really good friend of mine, Kwami Lee, on a creative photo workshop. BRWNSTU is the first workshop I’ve done, since 2018. The purpose of BRWNSTU is to give creatives a chance to be their own muse, while networking with other creatives in the fashion, art, and entertainment industries. This collaboration was really fulfilling for me, because I was able to curate and manage a space that 15-year-old me really needed when she first got into the industry. I’ve always seen the value in networking across, and that day reminded me of the importance of that.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think you’re born with creativity, but you are taught how to hone in on it. For some people that looks like painting, for others it’s writing. At one point in my life it was posing, now it’s also curating. We all have creativity that we’re born with. It’s just a matter of teaching yourself how you can best utilize it.

What do you know now that you wish you knew at the start of your career?

1. DELEGATE. Let people do their jobs. Just like you, they enjoy creating! Stop feeling like a nuisance for needing help.

2. Every journey is full of pivots or “stepping stones”. Don’t diminish your journey, because it got you into the rooms you are present in now. Success reminds us who we are, but stepping stones make us who we are.

How do you cultivate strong relationships with clients?

I cultivate strong relationships with clients through presence. Whether it means having amazing energy and positivity on set, or maintaining a strong social media presence through personality-filled posts. There are so many amazingly talented creatives to choose from when building a team, however, your presence and how you make others feel plays a big role in whether or not a client will bring you back.

Follow @taiilormade on Creatively.


Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Introducing CreativelyMade winner Nyasia Rudolph!

Each month, #CreativelyMade gives away $5,000 in cash plus exclusive prizes from partners to celebrate the amazing work of a creative on Creatively. Meet March’s winner, fashion stylist Nyasia Rudolph. 🏆

Meet Nyasia Rudolph, Fashion Stylist and CreativelyMade Winner.

Atlanta-born and New York-based, Nyasia’s love of mixing bold patterns and bright colors defines her signature eclectic style. As a teenager, she read endless copies of NYLON Magazine and was inspired by artists like Solange Knowles and Kelis for their heterogeneous styles. Having gone on to study art at Howard University, Nyasia is “always trying to use color theory in my work to tell a story.”

In 2018, Nyasia was awarded V-Files Stylist of the Year., and has been featured the Huffington Post, Nylon Germany, and Making The Leap. In 2021, she was signed to This Represents Agency, where she has styled countless shoots for commercial, advertising, and editorial clients like Allure and Condé Nast Traveler.

When Nyasia isn’t styling for brands, she’s directing her own photoshoots. The CreativelyMade grant will help fund more of these passion projects, allowing Nyasia to explore conceptual ideas and collaborate with other creatives.

Follow Nyasia Rudolph on #Creatively and share your work for a chance to be next month’s #CreativelyMade winner!

Meet Maddy Talias, an extreme-athlete-turned-cinematographer who’s always on the move.

Talias’s athletic background, having spent the early part of their life traveling the world on the international ski racing circuit, has inspired a passion for movement that’s evident in all of their work. For the past 7+ years, Talias has been making waves in both New York City and Los Angeles as a versatile cinematographer with experience spanning commercials, music videos, documentaries, and narrative films for prestigious brands like Coach, Girlfriend Collective, Nike, Bose, Disney, Refinery29, Estee Lauder, and Nylon, to name a few.

With an eye for the unexpected and a willingness to push boundaries, Talias is always looking for projects that challenge traditional structures and formats. They’re currently working on an immersive video experience that explores memory and relationships. Selected as one of our CreativelyCultured honorees by Sophie Elgort, Talias is a top-tier collaborator. They love working on teams, and their history as an extreme athlete has helped them feel at ease in high-pressure situations.

You can check out more of Maddy Talias’s work here on Creatively and @hellocreatively on Instagram.

Meet cinematographer Maddy Talias.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I made a video of our family cats when I was about 10 years old and the rest is history.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Gritty. Moving. Unexpected.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Space End—It’s a multi-channel video installation that has been in the works for the past year and a half. I made it with some of my close friends; Wilder Yari, Erikx DiSantis, Marla Phelan, Kinlaww and many more.  It will be going live in NY this summer.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think creativity is a muscle. It can stretch and grow overtime.

What do you know now that you wish you knew at the start of your career?

Always keep making personal work. The work you make just for yourself is usually the work that will resonate with people the most.

How do you cultivate strong relationships with clients?

Work hard, be a good listener, and be kind.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

If people are talking about me at all one hundred years from now, I will be stoked.

Follow @maddytalias on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective.

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Throughout Women’s History Month, we’ve been spotlighting remarkable women who are cultivating collective spaces across creative industries. Last, but certainly not least, is Elise Peterson—an LA-based artist, product designer, and host of the COOL MOMS podcast!

Peterson’s work explores the nuances of human experience through storytelling, using mediums like animated collage, recorded audio, and installation. Her approach blends reality and fantasy, interweaving internal and external moments to capture intimate experiences. She’s already made her mark on the literary world with her fantastical illustrations in two children’s books, “How Mamas Love Their Babies” and “The Nightlife of Jacuzzi Gasket.” In addition to her work as a visual artist, Peterson also hosts the popular podcast “COOL MOMS” featuring dynamic mothers who prioritize their passions like Brooke Devard, Yaris Sanchez, and Jillian Hervey.

Peterson has worked on extensive brand & community strategies for ByHeart, Lalo, and Virtue Worldwide—and was the founding music editor for Solange Knowles’s platform Saint Heron. More recently, she’s collaborated with brands like Zara, TheRealReal, Spotify, and more. If you’re looking for an artist whose work is both thought-provoking and visually stunning, Elise Peterson is definitely someone to keep on your radar!

You can check out more of Elise Peterson’s work here on Creatively and @hellocreatively on Instagram.

Meet “cool mom,” Elise Peterson.

What is the first creative project you remember?

In the 4th grade, I wrote and illustrated my first book about what happens in the teacher’s lounge. Even then, I was meticulous about the range of diversity and expression in all of my characters and how their unique perspectives were echoed in their aesthetic.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Sentimental. Expansive. Celestial.

3. What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I would have to name two for significant reasons: I became pregnant while working on the first children’s book I illustrated How Mamas Love Their Babies written by Juniper Fitzgerald and published by the Feminist Press. It was a literal when-life-imitates-art moment. Later, I was able to collaborate with my son Sargent (again) photographing and creative directing several Zara shoots with him as the muse. Influenced by the open markets in Brazil and inspired by his love of tropical fruit and the whimsy of traditional school play props, I was able to create a world that had special significance to both him and me.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

Creativity is something you are born with that can be nurtured and cultivated, or lost.

5. What do you know now that you wish you knew at the start of your career?

Everything you need you already possess.

6. How do you cultivate strong relationships with clients?

It’s important to align an understanding of what success looks like for a collaboration, be a direct communicator, and enjoy the work you are doing with the people you are doing it with.

7. One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I told the truth.

Follow @eliserpeterson on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective.

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Throughout Women’s History Month, we’re spotlighting remarkable women who are cultivating collective spaces across creative industries. Next up is DonYé Taylor—marketing consultant, digital creator, and creative philosopher.

Taylor is synonymous with authenticity, known for her docu-style approach to content. Her personal motto of “turning my life into style, and my passion into paychecks,” explains it all! Her monthly newsletter “To Whom It May Concern” provides creators with resources and motivation to help them thrive within their digital ecosystems. Recognized as a Forbes 30 Under 30 honoree in 2022, Taylor’s content breaks down pop culture’s biggest campaigns and social strategies to empower her audience with insights into how to leverage forward-thinking marketing tactics to boost revenue and drive growth. She runs her consulting agency like an underground digital speakeasy, taking on select clients through referrals only. Current clients include Grammy-nominated recording artist Tamar Braxton and media powerhouse Amazon Prime.

In addition to creating content as a lifestyle influencer, Taylor works behind the scenes as a consultant for Topicals, and in front of the camera as well—as seen in their interviews for ComplexCon.

You can check out more of DonYé Taylor’s work here on Creatively and @hellocreatively on Instagram.

Meet marketing consultant, digital creator, and creative philosopher, DonYé Taylor.

What is the first creative project you remember?

The first creative project that I remember vividly wasn’t my first one, but it was the first one that I remember. It was for a logo design that I did for my friend Paris—a cherry logo that I did in 2016. The reason I remember the logo is because she still uses it today, not because of the money that she paid me to do it. I think that speaks to the power of timeless design and how I was able to design from a timeless perspective, even when I first started. It also speaks to my growth as a creative, because I used to be someone who did only graphic design projects, but now I do way more on the creative consulting side of things.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Timeless. Eclectic. Passionate.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I think the most fulfilling collaboration that I’ve worked on to date was leading strategy and designing the first iteration of the Trayvon Martin non-profit website, back in 2017. That collaboration was the first time I felt like my creativity was used for something GOOD, like actually good. At that time the social climate was very heavy, so to put my creativity to use in that way as a Black woman—whether it’s collaborating on something to spread a meaningful message like Trayvon’s website or promoting a brand that dedicates itself to embracing Black beauty—it’s important that I align myself with projects that are purposeful to me.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think everyone has creativity born within them. I believe your ability to create is directly linked to what it is that you’re passionate about. Creativity is just a passion in physical art form. I think the problem is that so many people live their lives not knowing what it is that they are passionate about. Once someone is able to pinpoint their passion, creativity will show up in a lot of what they do in their day-to-day life.

What do you know now that you wish you knew at the start of your career?

I wish I knew that nothing is off limits and that anything is possible way sooner.

How do you cultivate strong relationships with clients?

By making them feel good. About everything. I shifted to being a little bit pickier with who I take on as clients so that I can have more time to build personal relationships with them. I help all of my clients unlock what I call a “Level 2” mindset by bringing them along with me on the creative process through education—helping them to re-wire their brains. I look at the work that we do as a creative collaboration, so I want them to feel confident in the work that is being done. Building an environment that encompasses my team and helps my clients feel confident in their creativity is really important to me. That goes a long way with them!

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I hope that people write something along the lines of this :

DonYé’s work and approach to creativity make anyone (creative or not) think outside the box, and look at the world differently. Her ability to synthesize, connect, and dissect art in a way that is easily digestible adds color to the world and puts creatives on a pedestal that allows them to be respected in a way that they never were before. She constantly gave people a look into her mind as a creative and used everything around her as inspiration in order to inspire others.”

Follow @donyetaylor on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative community.

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Throughout Women’s History Month, we’re spotlighting remarkable women who are cultivating collective spaces across creative industries. Meet Chela Mitchell—founder and director of Chela Mitchell Gallery.

Recognized as a voice for change in the art world, Mitchell is dedicated to the equity of artists and art professionals. She’s worked with institutions, corporations, and art collectors to inform their acquisitions in emerging, mid-career, and established markets. In addition to founding the Chela Mitchell Gallery, a contemporary space rooted in cultivating and amplifying unique voices in fine art and design, Mitchell serves as an art advisor helping collectors to build diverse collections.

Having grown up in a Black neighborhood in the Southeast corridor of Washington, D.C., Mitchell credits the city for her appetite for art and culture. Before devoting herself full-time to the art world, Chela worked as a fashion stylist at Net-a-Porter, Barneys New York, Intermix, and Vogue Japan. She has been featured in Cultured Magazine, Architectural Digest, Forbes, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, ArtNews, Artnet News, NR Magazine, and 10 Magazine. Mitchell’s work has also inspired the creation of Komuna, a global arts club hosting private exhibition tours and talks focusing on artists and patrons of color. They’ll soon be opening their membership again for 2023!

You can check out more of Chela Mitchell’s work here on Creatively and @hellocreatively on Instagram.

Meet art advisor and gallerist, Chela Mitchell

What is the first creative project you remember?

I remember making papier-mâché molds of our faces in my elementary school art class. I don’t recall which grade, but I remember it being a process. After the molds were formed, we had to let them dry and return the following week to paint them. I always got sad when the class ended.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Futuristic. Experimental. Dreamy.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

My daughter is hands down my most significant collaboration of all time, space, and lifetimes. Professionally, I loved art directing with Meek Mill, his team, and artist/photographer Nate Palmer to create imagery surrounding his ‘Expensive Pain’ project. It was extraordinary to watch someone who grew up from similar origins as myself who was daring enough to try something new. His vulnerability allowed us to capture something, unlike anything he had done before. Nate Palmer is uber-talented and young – I think fresh perspectives are essential for us to see the full spectrum of what art can be.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with or something you’re taught?

This is a great question—nature vs. nurture. I think you’re born with creativity. You’ll be attracted to what will advance your life’s purpose.

What do you know now that you wish you knew at the start of your career?

I wish I knew how to distinguish the difference between a colleague and a friend. I have it down now, but setting the boundaries is essential.

How do you cultivate strong relationships with clients?

I’m not transactional with my clients. Collectors can sense when you’re passionate about what you’re doing. It’s not something that you can pretend. I relish spending time and learning about their life outside of collecting. I go above and beyond to ensure that they have the best experience.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I’m grateful to be alive to witness some of what I’d like to be written. Recently, someone said that I’m a champion for artists – what an honor! I won’t be alive 100 years from now, but I hope that whatever they say about my work is fascinating. I’d hate to be a bore.

Follow @ChelaMitchellArt on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective.

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life