Layering fiber like a painter layers brush strokes, French artist Cécile Davidovici achieves a seemingly impossible level of depth in her embroidered masterpieces. Davidovici began her career as a writer and filmmaker before settling on a more tangible art form: textiles. From afar, the hues of her hand-stitched pieces seamlessly blend together to fool the eye; up close, one discovers hundreds of small stitches combining to create an effect reminiscent of the impasto technique (the thick layering of paint to produce a textured effect) made famous by none other than Van Gogh. 

In her recent series, “Portraits of a constant dream,” Davidovici creates a landscape of skin that reveals not a shred of negative space on the canvas. By meticulously intertwining her threads, Davidovici is able to reinterpret faces, simultaneously enhancing and blurring her subject’s features much the way an impressionist painter might. In addition to her signature, close-up portraits, Davidovici has explored landscapes, still lifes, and mixed media creations, all of which leverage her unique style of embroidery—the common thread which runs across her exquisite body of work.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet thread visual artist, Cécile Davidovici.

What is the first creative project you remember? 

I remember building a very complex pencil box set with cloudy light blue gift wrap, toilet paper cardboard, and a few match boxes around maybe the age of five. In my head, the final product was incredible but it was probably terrible.

Describe your aesthetic in three words. 

Transparency. Touchable. Intimate.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I co-created a series of three pieces called “La saison des feux” (“fire season”) with David Ctiborsky. I loved it because it challenged and changed my whole process of creation. I learned so much during the making of those pieces and I loved working with David. He has such a different approach than mine. It’s very interesting how our creative worlds complete one another’s.

From Cécile’s collaboration with David Citborksy, “La saison des feux.”

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

My first series called “project <<1988”, where I embroidered images from my childhood VHS videos that my parents filmed, taught me a great deal and gave me the confidence to move forward with my work. 

A piece from Cécile’s first series, “project <<1988.”

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

Both! Some people are more gifted than others from the start, but it’s what you do with it and how you’re taught to embrace it that makes the difference, I think.

What’s the last dream you had?

I was with my mom and we were trying to win some sort of cuisine competition; I was cooking like a mad person. A very restful dream… 

A piece from Cécile’s “Portraits of a Constant Dream” series.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I would love to have brought something to the contemporary art table in terms of the perception of textile and embroidered art. It’s still under the radar today and I hope it will evolve and become an established art form like painting.

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Blazing sunsets, fuschia skylines, and bubblegum pink clouds: welcome to the digitally rendered world of Danner Orozco. Orozco is a visual artist from Colombia who puts his anachronistic, futuristic stamp on everything from collages, to cover art, and even NFTs.

Orozco’s work ranges from surrealist collages to dreamy landscapes. Orozco’s palette is dominated by neon blues, pinks, and purples, which blend together to produce the unique effect of a photographic negative that’s been updated for the digital future—a stylistic flourish borne out of his admiration for old-school film photography.

Inspired by the cosmos, Orozco uses his wild imagination to dream up (and then render) his strange and exhilarating signature scenes. The sun and the moon are recurring motifs—oftentimes focal points, stretching beyond their natural scale, and demanding the viewer’s attention. Simply put, Orozco’s work is out of this world.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet digital artist, Danner Orozco.

What is the first creative project you remember? 

The first creative project I remember working on was a photography project. As I gained more experience in this medium, I began my “Yagedan” project which, in the beginning, might have best been described as a spatial and nostalgic collage.

Describe your aesthetic in three words. 

Aesthetics, color, stimulation.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I’ve enjoyed collaborating with art companies that want to license a certain number of copies of my work. What I like about these relationships is that the response to payment and advertising is instant.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

More than just a project, but rather a process that has taught (and continues to teach) me about myself is the empirical search for inspiration drawn from the color palettes of film photography. I think this process is fundamental to my work, and it’s a process that I always approach with love.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I believe that all human beings are creative, but I also believe that creativity is a skill that must be honed over time. No one is born [having learned creativity already].

What’s the last dream you had?

In the last dream I had I traveled all over the world showing my works and meeting with other artists, with whom I even formed musical projects.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I hope that people write something pure from the bottom of their hearts and that they continue to keep my work alive for many centuries or millennia to come.

Follow @DannerOrozco on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

For street artist Dirt Cobain, art is a drug. Cobain is behind murals that can be seen from the Compton metro stop in Los Angeles and the 7 train platform in Sunnyside, Queens, among other noteworthy locations. While he is best known for audacious references to drug paraphernalia like a giant pill bottle labeled, “U get me so high,” Cobain urges his viewers against interpreting the work too literally, intending instead to reflect whatever gives us, his audience, a rush. 

Originally from the Bay Area, Cobain attributes his inspiration to the street art scene in San Francisco, where he spent his formative years admiring the wild lettering and artistic chaos of the city’s graffiti. Out of this came his urban pop-art aesthetic that embraces the grit and grime of big-city living, hence his pseudonym. Whether he’s exploring wood cutouts with resin or acrylic paint on canvas, Cobain brings his signature neon oranges, pinks and stark black lettering to all of his catchphrases like, “I’m gonna need a Xanax for this,” or, “Cruizin for a boozin.” Color us addicted.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet street artist, Dirt Cobain.

What is the first creative project you remember? 

One of my first “official” creative projects that I can remember was painting a 10-foot by 10-foot mural of one of Rembrandt’s classic paintings in the hallway of my high school many many years ago.

Describe your aesthetic in three words. 

Authentic, original, unique. 

One of Dirt Cobain’s classic designs.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

This is a tough one because I’ve collaborated with so many awesome artists and creatives, but I always love collaborating and creating with Dave Navarro. He’s very particular in his work, pays attention to detail the way that I do, and we can relate to each other’s creative process.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I learn something in every project that I do. Even if it’s something small. As an artist, I feel like you should always be learning and growing. 

Hard Times: One of Dirt’s murals.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I’ll be honest, I think creativity is something you’re born with. You either got it or you don’t. 

What’s the last dream you had? 

I rarely have dreams because I never get any sleep. Lol.

One of Dirt’s NYC murals.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I think every artist wants to be remembered as “great” but that’s not up to me to decide, that’s up to the masses. All I can do is keep pursuing my journey and hope that people feel my vibe.

Follow @DirtCobain on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

We can only imagine that as a child, Andrew Tedesco must have often found himself in trouble for scribbling on the floors, the walls, the ceiling. Thankfully, Tedesco never grew out of that phase, instead blossoming into a masterful muralist whose mandate is to leave no surface untouched. Drawing inspiration from the likes of Michelangelo, Tiepolo, and Leonardo da Vinci, Tedesco has been creating custom hand-painted murals for over twenty years. 

Tedesco launched his career as a muralist in 1991, specializing in gilding, venetian plasters, and optical illusions. Tedesco’s style hews most closely to Realism, but his body of work is remarkably diverse, with pieces spanning not only genres but also the commercial and artistic realms. Over the course of his career, Tedesco has illustrated a Roman mythological story across a 38-foot barrel vaulted ceiling, depicted the life of Cornelius Vanderbilt in the Ioggia entrance hall of a hotel, and painted sports team logos on the paneled wood ceiling of a superfan’s den. He is based in New York City but has travelled as far as Egypt for a commission. Whether he’s making a four car garage look like a spaceship, or a hotel ceiling look like a 17th century fresco, you dream it, Tedesco can paint it. 

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet painter and muralist, Andrew Tedesco.

What is the first creative project you remember? 

There is a picture on my website of me painting a diorama in kindergarten at a farm school outside of Detroit, MI. Inside the school’s geodesic dome there were supplies to create anything you could imagine with no rubrics. I still have my wood block print of sharks, still my greatest fear. The free form style of the school allowed my artistic freedom to grow unabashedly.

Describe your aesthetic in three words. 

Pretty, pleasing and always personal.

Tedesco at work.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I have had the chance to work with well-known interior designers, architects and

famous clients but my best collaboration has just taken place: my 24 year-old daughter joined me during the pandemic when my regular assistants could not come in. She had gone to art high school in California and I knew she was talented but had no idea how great our partnership would be. There is a synergy between us that has produced some of my best work in the last 30 years. I have had many talented assistants come through the studio but no one has the design sense of Abbey.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I was contacted by Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas early in my career. When I arrived to meet with them, they showed me a 60-foot dome. I had never painted anything near this scale or scope. When the president of the casino asked if this was something I could do, I immediately said yes and just about fainted. After accomplishing this feat, I gained the confidence to take on any project presented to me without hesitation.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I am the fourth generation in my family to make a living as an artist so yes, I absolutely believe it is a gift. After teaching art on Mondays at the New York School of Interior Design in Manhattan for five years, I could see that some people innately get it, while others, I’m not sure they could master painting if they spent a lifetime practicing.

A ceiling mural by Tedesco in Miami Beach.

What’s the last dream you had?

Hah. Honestly, it was about lacrosse. My two younger daughters are in the middle

of their high school season and the older one just scored the winning goal in double overtime. Obviously my competitive nature is still present even while I am sleeping.

Tedesco at work with his daughter.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

“Looking back to move forward.” I hope they’ll say that I paid homage to the great artists that came before me: Leonardo and Michelangelo, Tiepolo and Rust, Fairey and Banksy, but that I carved my own niche. 

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Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Surrounded by three generations of fiercely ambitious women, fashion designer Tanya Taylor was practically destined to become a creative entrepreneur. Today, she runs her highly successful, eponymous fashion brand, which has been worn by a diverse range of prominent women such as former First Lady Michelle Obama, Beyoncé, Taylor Swift, and Gigi Hadid, among others. 

After graduating from McGill University with a Bachelor of Commerce in Finance, Taylor signed up for a design summer program on a whim, which eventually precipitated her enrollment at the Parsons School of Design in New York City. Taylor went on to land a coveted internship at Elizabeth and James, quickly working her way up the ranks and advancing to assistant womenswear designer under the direction of Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen. In two years’ time, at the young age of 25, she decided to launch her own brand, leveraging her business education to serve her creative passion.

As an award-winning designer, Taylor continually looks for ways to break the status quo, revolutionizing inclusive sizing, hosting fashion shows in untraditional places, and focusing on blending unexpected design elements with uncomplicated, feminine silhouettes. In addition to honing her forward-thinking aesthetic, Taylor is dedicated to engaging with and supporting the community, actively seeking ways to volunteer, raise funds, or raise awareness for important causes. Taylor’s designs represent a sense of fearlessness, encouraging women from all walks of life to celebrate their confidence—simply by getting dressed in the morning.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet fashion designer, Tanya Taylor.

What is the first creative project you remember?

Painting the walls of my childhood basement with 7-foot 1950s pin-up girls and old Corvettes. My friends used to ask me to come over to hang out but I would ask them to come over to help be my painting team; I transformed the walls to create a retro recreation room. When my Mom sold the house, she carved the paintings out of the drywall and now we have super heavy, insanely large remnants living in her basement. That’s love.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Feminine, creative, and personal.

Pieces from Tanya Taylor’s Spring 2022 Collection.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Working with Memorial Sloan Kettering on redesigning the hospital curtains of the pediatric oncology floor in our painted, colorful art. I want our art to inspire and uplift, and I was so honored to think it could have an impact on a young patient’s life when they need it most.

Tanya Taylor’s redesigned hospital curtains for Memorial Sloan Kettering.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I never realized how much I loved customer analytics and digital innovation before partnering with Bitmoji on their first fashion launch. I’ve always loved my job, but I have never loved it more than when we were creating digital avatars of our clothing, and seeing millions of people use them to express themselves. 

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

For me, it’s something I was born with, but it was also cultivated by the experiences my parents gave me. As a kid, I was encouraged to craft, paint, papier-mâché, build dollhouses, sew clothing, and just generally create, create, create. I honestly think creativity comes from an open mind and a willingness to eliminate fear from your thought process. 

TT Home: Tanya Taylor’s limited edition home collection.

What’s the last dream you had?

I was lying down with my late, furry cat Oscar in a multicolored field of tulips in Holland. I have very colorful dreams.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

That wearing the brand unlocked a confidence to express themselves and feel stronger. That the brand redefined fashion to feel uplifting, inviting, and impactful. That we were a generous, creative, inspiring brand that made people feel included and empowered. That there were no boundaries as to where our creativity could live. My 100 year goal is to have a community art institute in Toronto that brings students from different neighborhoods together to learn how to combine entrepreneurship with their love of the arts.

Follow @tanya_taylor on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

As we approach the end of Latinx Heritage Month, we are proud to spotlight and celebrate the incredible creative contributions of the Latinx and Hispanic artists on Creatively all year long.

In a world where the digital threatens to replace the physical, it’s artists like Juliana Plexxo whom we count on to uphold and preserve the relevancy, the immediacy, and the emotional resonance of creative practices rooted in tradition. Born in Bogotá, Colombia, Plexxo is a contemporary artist and muralist known for combining painting with the age-old technique of engraving, creating a style wholly her own.

Plexxo discovered her gift for painting as a young child, and has spent her life polishing her skills while pushing the boundaries of the medium. With an undeniable proclivity for reds, whites and blacks, inspiration for Plexxo’s color palettes can be traced back to her late father, a journalist who covered bullfighting with whom she attended many fights. Her work is defined by geometric shapes reminiscent of early 20th-century abstract expressionism that come together to form faces, eyes, and animals more frequently found in Latin folk art.

Plexxo studied at the University of Navarra and was selected among a small, elite group of emerging artists for a residency at the legendary Joan Barbará workshop, the famous studio in Barcelona where renowned artists such as Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró and Salvador Dalí mastered the art of engraving. Positioning herself at the intersection between past and present, implementing traditional practices to express contemporary content, one can confidently say that Plexxo has carved her niche as an artist.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet illustrator and muralist, Juliana Plexxo.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I have had a few creative projects but the first creative project that I remember with great passion was when I began to learn the technique of engraving. Ever since I got involved, I told myself that my mission was to give back to the world this ancient artistic technique that was so glorious in periods such as the Renaissance. Life gave me the opportunity to be chosen by the Joan Barbará engraving workshop, the place where great masters such as Dalí, Picasso, Miró, and many more created their works. It is an honor that my pieces come from this place.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Mystical, past, future.

“FUERZA” by Juliana Plexxo.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I was recently invited by the Misonny Art Festival in Costa Brava, Spain, to make a live mural with Australian artist Sarah Main. It was a challenge because it was a live performance for two days but it was very satisfactory. We are both women and, you know, normally you are used to seeing men doing murals but I really liked living the experience and connecting with the people who went to the art festival. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

The project I learned the most from was painting the “Raices” (roots) mural in the indigenous region of Ecuador. It was an 8-meter mural in Hacienda Pinsaqui, a 1700s villa and the former residence of Simón Bolívar. I dedicated this project to the indigenous culture that continues to endure. I realized that many times in Latin culture we ourselves deny our ancestors, but this mural made me spend a week surrounded by the indigenous community. Many of them work on the villa and I realized that they are the purest and most noble people that I had ever known in my life. It was something that I cannot describe in words, something mystical and that is what my art is about, mysticism.

Juliana’s “Raices” mural in Ecuador.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I’ve always asked myself this question—it’s like the chicken or the egg. The only thing that is clear to me is that all humans have creativity, and the difference between having more or less creativity is curiosity. The most creative and inventive people in the world are children; they are always questioning everything. Curiosity is the secret and fuel of creativity and I personally believe that curiosity is something that is formed over time, the interest in discovering something new every day. Curiosity always motivates us and that is acquired. A very good example is when your work motivates you, you want to know more and more every day, there is curiosity and behind comes creativity. But if your work does not motivate you, you are not interested in knowing more and creativity decreases notably. A scientist is a super creative person because he loves what he does, gets involved, has curiosity on the surface and continues to discover through creativity. It’s the same with the artist. An artist who makes his art with the soul will never lack creativity.

What’s the last dream you had?

This is something that I tend to write about lately. Dreams are very important for human beings, in my opinion. They act as a mirror and, as I have mentioned, I love everything that has some mysticity, and dreams are a good example. My last recurring dream is that I am in a parallel universe. I would even call it a Plexxo universe because graphically I come across many works that I have done over time.

Juliana at work.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I would love it if 100 years from now people could understand what the engraving technique is. That is my mission as a young artist now, to rescue the technique, and I would like them to know that Juliana Plexxo was a Latin woman artist proud of her roots.

Follow @JulianaPlexxo on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

At Creatively, our mission is to champion creative talent and nurture a community that truly reflects the diversity across the full spectrum of the creative economy. As we mark Latinx Heritage Month, we’re proud to spotlight and celebrate the incredible creative contributions of the Latinx and Hispanic artists on Creatively.

Strands of hair intricately swirled across her forehead, complemented by perfectly winged eyeliner and holographic eyeshadow. Oh, and that’s just one of the many looks that have landed drag performer Chiquitita coverage in Vogue, W Magazine, Cosmopolitan, PAPER and Dazed. Born and raised in New York City, Chiquitita is a first-generation Salvadoran-American.

Based in New York City, Chiquitita has been featured in campaigns for apparel brands such as Helmut Lang, H&M and Steve Madden, while collaborating with companies like Netflix, Instagram and Bubly, among others—reshaping the narrative around modeling by making the industry more inclusive. In 2018, Chiquitita had the honor of being crowned Miss Bushwig at Bushwig, a yearly pageant and drag festival that celebrates innovation and creativity in performance. Chiquitita is also the creator and producer of the annual Met Gayla, a queer celebration where drag queens showcase their take on that year’s Met Gala theme.

In addition to her work on stage, Chiquitita creates drag and gender-bending visual art for corporate clients while performing in digital and live shows with world-renowned artists such as Lady Gaga, Charli XCX, Lil’ Kim and Yaeiji. Between her hand-sewn dresses, perfectly applied makeup and myriad talents, what one discovers is a whole that’s greater than the sum of its parts: a presence that could fill a stadium, a star born to rule the stage.

Meet drag performer, Chiquitita.

What is the first creative project you remember?

As a kid I was always doing art projects, painting and drawing, but the first time I really recall taking designs off the paper and turning them into something big was when I started doing drag. My mom is skilled with a sewing machine, so luckily she started teaching me how to sew at 15, when I started wanting to go out and create looks. So it was definitely there, in my bedroom in Queens, learning the basics of sewing where I started to get lost in the creative process in a new way. I would bang out almost 3 looks a week and wear them with pride! They were my own special creations and I couldn’t wait to show them off. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Glamour, gracious, goddess. (Is “gracious” an aesthetic word? I don’t know, but I like how it sounds.)

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on? 

The collaborations that stand out most are the ones where I am allowed to be authentically myself, and not channel the idea of the creative director or photographer. As much as I also love being forced to step out of my comfort zone from time to time, creating new concepts for shoots, or performance ideas with other creatives where we have control is always exhilarating! This past spring, I was in Provincetown and got to shoot a project with my friend and photographer Sam Waxman; it was one of the first things I’ve really directed from start to finish. Sam was so great and helped me realize my vision via his insane talents behind the lens. It’s definitely been one of my favorite collaborations thus far!

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself? 

Earlier this year I created an insane zebra gown. It was over 10 feet tall and required me being rigged and hoisted up in order to see the dress in its full glory. I worked on it with my friend for about two weeks. It taught me that I have the ability to create anything I could ever want, no matter how extravagant, with the right amount of space, fabric, and help.

Chiquitita’s 10-foot-tall zebra gown.

Chiquitita’s 10-foot-tall zebra gown.

Do you think Creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I can’t speak for others, but for me personally, I think creativity is something inherent inside us, and accessing it actually requires letting go a bit, giving the creativity space to make itself known. I’ve been my most creative when I can let my psyche do the work, letting my mind go where it wants. Recently, I’ve been finding that I have some of my best ideas when I’m about to sleep, when my active brain starts to take a rest. I keep a notebook by my bed so I can write them down as they come, otherwise the ideas may not come back! 

What’s the last dream you had? 

Candidly, last night I dreamt I was friends with Billie Eilish and we went to a Greenday show where they were covering music by my friend, Macy Rodman. I don’t know how this came about, but it did, and now I need it to come true!

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work? 

A hundred years from now, I would love to know that I played even a small part in creating the creative and dynamic fabric that makes up New York City. On a deeper level, I also hope that my life will be a great representation for trans people everywhere. When I’m older, if I can reach a fraction of the level of iconic-ness that some of the trans women have achieved whom I’ve looked up to since I was a kid, I will be happy!

Follow @Chiquitita on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

At Creatively, our mission is to champion creative talent and nurture a community that truly reflects the diversity across the full spectrum of the creative economy. As we mark Latinx Heritage Month, we’re proud to spotlight and celebrate the incredible creative contributions of the Latinx and Hispanic artists on Creatively.

If one could literally stretch one’s imagination, the result would look something like Felix Semper’s expandable paper sculptures. Semper is a Cuban-American artist and sculptor whose work has gained international recognition, finding its way into the collections of celebrities and global corporations such as A$AP Rocky, DJ Khaled, Kelly Ripa, Microsoft, and Adidas, among others.

While sculpture helped Semper make a name for himself, his work as a painter reveals a broad stylistic range, reflecting the aesthetics of art movements such as neo-expressionism, pop art and street art. In blending techniques and vibrant color palettes, Semper lends his subjects an undeniable sense of freedom and spontaneity.  

Semper’s process begins with him glueing hundreds of sheets of paper together before carving those connected layers into sneakers, handbags, food items, animals and celebrity busts. The resulting work invites viewers to experience sculpture in a new light, bringing a fluid, playful mobility to a traditionally rigid medium.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet visual artist, Felix Semper.

What is the first creative project you remember?

If I think back to my first project, it was when I was in elementary school. My friend and I did a one-minute hand drawn animated film for a school competition. For the project, we created a cartoon character that was hunting a rabbit. We ended up winning an award.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

I would say people are “wowed” when they see my work. Also, “surprising” and “happy” are emotions that come up. 

Semper creates jaw-dropping sculptures and portraits out of paper.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

The most fulfilling and one of the most public [collaborations] was with A$AP Rocky. He called me up to collaborate with him on his album. He wanted me to design and create sculptures for the cover, and even though the team decided to go in a different direction, the collaboration was fun to do! I love doing collaborations with other artists and being able to mix different mediums and different creative pieces together. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

The A$AP Rocky collaboration taught me to just be simple and straight on. I learned to be myself and not sugarcoat my creativity. 

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think creativity is something you’re born with. I think it’s like any gift you have, you have to build it. Any muscles you have, you work on them to get stronger. You have to work on your creativity. 

Semper shows how his intricate pieces are also interactive.

What’s the last dream you had?

My dream is to have a home in the Mediterranean with a workspace to create while being surrounded by visually appealing landscapes. I want to be able to enhance my creativity. 

Semper at work on a new piece.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

In 100 years from now, I hope people are still surprised and learn something from my work. I hope they will look at my work and say, “This is from 100 years ago, but it’s still fresh today.” 

Follow @FelixSemper on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

At Creatively, our mission is to champion creative talent and nurture a community that truly reflects the diversity across the full spectrum of the creative economy. As we mark Latinx Heritage Month, we’re proud to spotlight and celebrate the incredible creative contributions of the Latinx and Hispanic artists on Creatively, starting with Victoria Villasana.

If there’s a common thread unifying Villasana’s work, it’s the celebration of imperfection. Born in Guadalajara, Mexico, Villasana is known for embroidering photographs, embellishing her images with three-dimensional threads that dangle beyond the frame. Villasana splits her time between Mexico and England, continuing to hone her craft through installations, commissions, and collaborations around the world.

Using her artwork to bridge the gap between tradition and the avant-garde, Villasana’s drive to create is borne of an insatiable interest in history, culture, and the interrelations of people in a fragmented, post-digital world. Weaving stories onto her images in her surreal, unfinished aesthetic, she is able to express the resiliency and creativity of the human spirit and accent specific features of her subjects which include Nina Simone, Marylin Monroe, Mister Rogers, and Yayoi Kusama, among many others.  

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet visual artist, Victoria Villasana.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I remember doing a collaboration with a Spanish photographer and a Spanish street artist in the streets of London.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Colourful, storytelling, patterns.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I worked with a charity in New Zealand where I traveled for a month doing workshops for different communities around the country. I even gave a workshop in a jail. I met really wonderful people and it was an amazing experience.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I think most projects teach me to be myself, to not take things too seriously, to have fun.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I believe we are all creative, but we are creative in different ways. Humans are constantly creating things, it is part of our nature, the problem is that we are creators and destroyers at the same time, and it is up to us if we use our energy for destruction or creation.

What’s the last dream you had?

Every dream I have had in the last five years has come true. This is not to say that my life has been perfect; I experienced a lot of difficulties and pain in between, but overall, many of my dreams have come true and I am very grateful for that.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I really don’t know, but I hope people see a symbiosis of the paradoxes in the human experience: history and the future, tradition and defiance, solitude and belonging, the material and the sacred.

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Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Championing creativity at New York’s big reopening.

This September, Creatively is celebrating the vibrant, diverse creatives in our community whose imagination, skill, and ambition make all of our lives brighter and more enjoyable. In just over a year, 200,000 creatives have joined Creatively to showcase their portfolios, connect with one another, and find jobs. More than 1,400 companies are now using the job platform for creatives to find creators for full-time and freelance jobs.

Starting this week, we’re bringing some of the most exciting artists on Creatively to the streets of New York City, cheering on the city’s big fall reopening with stunning works by Broadie, Amber Vittoria, Tyler Spangler, Mulan Fu, Adrien Saporiti, and Friend and Nemesis. Get a sneak peek at the campaign creative below, and follow these artists on Creatively to see more of their latest work.

What’s more, Creatively will pop up in secret locations all over the city during the much-anticipated return of New York Fashion Week. Follow along on Instagram @hellocreatively for all the details! 

Broadie

Broadie is a graphic artist from the Greater D.C. area who blends his skills in graphic design with his love of mixed media. His artwork of Stacey Abrams went viral during election season and took his following to new heights, as his work was shared by A-list celebrities and major platforms. Broadie challenges the boundaries of traditional mixed media art using square color schemes, along with various techniques that incorporate digital painting, vector, 3D, and photo-manipulations. He draws his inspiration from the richness of Black culture—the past, present and possibilities of the future. 

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Amber Vittoria

Amber Vittoria is an illustrator and painter based in New York City. Her work centers on the portrayal of women within art—featuring colorful illustrations that play with the idea of femininity and the feminine form, including overtly extended limbs and playfully rounded features. In a painting series called “How We Carry Ourselves,” for example, women are represented as colorful swirls of paint with little heads and feet, with titles like “Fancy for FaceTime” and “My Posture is Perfect.” Her creative style has earned her mint collaborators like NBC, Warby Parker, Gucci, The New York Times, and Instagram, as well as a nod from Forbes, which included her on its “30 Under 30” list in 2020. Vittoria’s recent work has taken a digital turn:  “I’ve been exploring the digital aspect of my works,” she says, “and how the bold, colorful lines in turn inform my paintings.”

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Tyler Spangler

Tyler Spangler is a digital artist based in Seattle, Washington. Through his work, he plays with color and animation, often interposing bright color with aged black and white photos to create an eye-catching, pop-meets-surreal effect. His dazzling work has won him an impressive roster of clients including Chanel, Instagram, Nike, and Starbucks. He describes his way of working as “a bit obsessive”; at one point, he created as many as 2,000 pieces in a single year. 

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Mulan Fu

Mulan Fu is an award-winning filmmaker, animator, and illustrator based in New York City. Her commercial work ranges from 2D animation, motion graphics, and illustration to animated production creative development. As a storyteller, Fu is intrigued by the visual richness of Chinese mythologies and the emotional depth of touching familial stories. She aims to explore and promote the Chinese cultural identity through charming and unique tales that have the potential to bridge cultural differences. Growing up in Asia and studying abroad in Europe and North America, she finds passion in discovering captivating stories along her travels and sharing them with the world through the magical medium of animation. Fu is currently “exploring interactive media and its combination with animated content” at her master’s program at Columbia University, as well as working in the Chinese feature animation industry as part of the development team at Pearl Studio (Abominable, Over the Moon). 

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Adrien Saporiti

Adrien Saporiti is a Nashville native who currently splits his time between his hometown and Portland, Oregon. The son of a Vietnamese oil painter and a musician from South Boston, Saporiti believes his unique upbringing, coupled with growing up biracial in the American South, gives his work a distinct aesthetic and sense of storytelling. After graduating from the Berklee College of Music, Saporiti founded an apparel company and began creating street art around Nashville; most notably the now iconic, I BELIEVE IN NASHVILLE symbol. What’s Saporiti working on now? “I’m preparing for a show in Nashville in October, creating a collection that will be dropping in November, and working on getting a series of art prints and the second series of my ‘I Must Belong Somewhere’ prints ready to drop next month.”

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Friend and Nemesis

Friend and Nemesis is a one-stop creative collective based in Philadelphia. The husband and wife duo, photographer Andreas Billig and designer Kristy Lee, embraced the idea of bringing their creative talents of photography, styling, and design into a common frame through shared mediums. Inspired by the circus and carnival fairs, the concept of different mediums working together was their anchor. The vision was to create a brand that would showcase personalities and characters with a candid and non-judgmental approach. The brand originated in London with a photo series, and they later launched Friend and Nemesis in Brooklyn with a collection of jewelry and accessories photographed in their narrative style. 

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