As we approach the end of Latinx Heritage Month, we are proud to spotlight and celebrate the incredible creative contributions of the Latinx and Hispanic artists on Creatively all year long.

In a world where the digital threatens to replace the physical, it’s artists like Juliana Plexxo whom we count on to uphold and preserve the relevancy, the immediacy, and the emotional resonance of creative practices rooted in tradition. Born in Bogotá, Colombia, Plexxo is a contemporary artist and muralist known for combining painting with the age-old technique of engraving, creating a style wholly her own.

Plexxo discovered her gift for painting as a young child, and has spent her life polishing her skills while pushing the boundaries of the medium. With an undeniable proclivity for reds, whites and blacks, inspiration for Plexxo’s color palettes can be traced back to her late father, a journalist who covered bullfighting with whom she attended many fights. Her work is defined by geometric shapes reminiscent of early 20th-century abstract expressionism that come together to form faces, eyes, and animals more frequently found in Latin folk art.

Plexxo studied at the University of Navarra and was selected among a small, elite group of emerging artists for a residency at the legendary Joan Barbará workshop, the famous studio in Barcelona where renowned artists such as Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró and Salvador Dalí mastered the art of engraving. Positioning herself at the intersection between past and present, implementing traditional practices to express contemporary content, one can confidently say that Plexxo has carved her niche as an artist.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet illustrator and muralist, Juliana Plexxo.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I have had a few creative projects but the first creative project that I remember with great passion was when I began to learn the technique of engraving. Ever since I got involved, I told myself that my mission was to give back to the world this ancient artistic technique that was so glorious in periods such as the Renaissance. Life gave me the opportunity to be chosen by the Joan Barbará engraving workshop, the place where great masters such as Dalí, Picasso, Miró, and many more created their works. It is an honor that my pieces come from this place.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Mystical, past, future.

“FUERZA” by Juliana Plexxo.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I was recently invited by the Misonny Art Festival in Costa Brava, Spain, to make a live mural with Australian artist Sarah Main. It was a challenge because it was a live performance for two days but it was very satisfactory. We are both women and, you know, normally you are used to seeing men doing murals but I really liked living the experience and connecting with the people who went to the art festival. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

The project I learned the most from was painting the “Raices” (roots) mural in the indigenous region of Ecuador. It was an 8-meter mural in Hacienda Pinsaqui, a 1700s villa and the former residence of Simón Bolívar. I dedicated this project to the indigenous culture that continues to endure. I realized that many times in Latin culture we ourselves deny our ancestors, but this mural made me spend a week surrounded by the indigenous community. Many of them work on the villa and I realized that they are the purest and most noble people that I had ever known in my life. It was something that I cannot describe in words, something mystical and that is what my art is about, mysticism.

Juliana’s “Raices” mural in Ecuador.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I’ve always asked myself this question—it’s like the chicken or the egg. The only thing that is clear to me is that all humans have creativity, and the difference between having more or less creativity is curiosity. The most creative and inventive people in the world are children; they are always questioning everything. Curiosity is the secret and fuel of creativity and I personally believe that curiosity is something that is formed over time, the interest in discovering something new every day. Curiosity always motivates us and that is acquired. A very good example is when your work motivates you, you want to know more and more every day, there is curiosity and behind comes creativity. But if your work does not motivate you, you are not interested in knowing more and creativity decreases notably. A scientist is a super creative person because he loves what he does, gets involved, has curiosity on the surface and continues to discover through creativity. It’s the same with the artist. An artist who makes his art with the soul will never lack creativity.

What’s the last dream you had?

This is something that I tend to write about lately. Dreams are very important for human beings, in my opinion. They act as a mirror and, as I have mentioned, I love everything that has some mysticity, and dreams are a good example. My last recurring dream is that I am in a parallel universe. I would even call it a Plexxo universe because graphically I come across many works that I have done over time.

Juliana at work.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I would love it if 100 years from now people could understand what the engraving technique is. That is my mission as a young artist now, to rescue the technique, and I would like them to know that Juliana Plexxo was a Latin woman artist proud of her roots.

Follow @JulianaPlexxo on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

At Creatively, our mission is to champion creative talent and nurture a community that truly reflects the diversity across the full spectrum of the creative economy. As we mark Latinx Heritage Month, we’re proud to spotlight and celebrate the incredible creative contributions of the Latinx and Hispanic artists on Creatively.

Strands of hair intricately swirled across her forehead, complemented by perfectly winged eyeliner and holographic eyeshadow. Oh, and that’s just one of the many looks that have landed drag performer Chiquitita coverage in Vogue, W Magazine, Cosmopolitan, PAPER and Dazed. Born and raised in New York City, Chiquitita is a first-generation Salvadoran-American.

Based in New York City, Chiquitita has been featured in campaigns for apparel brands such as Helmut Lang, H&M and Steve Madden, while collaborating with companies like Netflix, Instagram and Bubly, among others—reshaping the narrative around modeling by making the industry more inclusive. In 2018, Chiquitita had the honor of being crowned Miss Bushwig at Bushwig, a yearly pageant and drag festival that celebrates innovation and creativity in performance. Chiquitita is also the creator and producer of the annual Met Gayla, a queer celebration where drag queens showcase their take on that year’s Met Gala theme.

In addition to her work on stage, Chiquitita creates drag and gender-bending visual art for corporate clients while performing in digital and live shows with world-renowned artists such as Lady Gaga, Charli XCX, Lil’ Kim and Yaeiji. Between her hand-sewn dresses, perfectly applied makeup and myriad talents, what one discovers is a whole that’s greater than the sum of its parts: a presence that could fill a stadium, a star born to rule the stage.

Meet drag performer, Chiquitita.

What is the first creative project you remember?

As a kid I was always doing art projects, painting and drawing, but the first time I really recall taking designs off the paper and turning them into something big was when I started doing drag. My mom is skilled with a sewing machine, so luckily she started teaching me how to sew at 15, when I started wanting to go out and create looks. So it was definitely there, in my bedroom in Queens, learning the basics of sewing where I started to get lost in the creative process in a new way. I would bang out almost 3 looks a week and wear them with pride! They were my own special creations and I couldn’t wait to show them off. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Glamour, gracious, goddess. (Is “gracious” an aesthetic word? I don’t know, but I like how it sounds.)

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on? 

The collaborations that stand out most are the ones where I am allowed to be authentically myself, and not channel the idea of the creative director or photographer. As much as I also love being forced to step out of my comfort zone from time to time, creating new concepts for shoots, or performance ideas with other creatives where we have control is always exhilarating! This past spring, I was in Provincetown and got to shoot a project with my friend and photographer Sam Waxman; it was one of the first things I’ve really directed from start to finish. Sam was so great and helped me realize my vision via his insane talents behind the lens. It’s definitely been one of my favorite collaborations thus far!

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself? 

Earlier this year I created an insane zebra gown. It was over 10 feet tall and required me being rigged and hoisted up in order to see the dress in its full glory. I worked on it with my friend for about two weeks. It taught me that I have the ability to create anything I could ever want, no matter how extravagant, with the right amount of space, fabric, and help.

Chiquitita’s 10-foot-tall zebra gown.

Chiquitita’s 10-foot-tall zebra gown.

Do you think Creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I can’t speak for others, but for me personally, I think creativity is something inherent inside us, and accessing it actually requires letting go a bit, giving the creativity space to make itself known. I’ve been my most creative when I can let my psyche do the work, letting my mind go where it wants. Recently, I’ve been finding that I have some of my best ideas when I’m about to sleep, when my active brain starts to take a rest. I keep a notebook by my bed so I can write them down as they come, otherwise the ideas may not come back! 

What’s the last dream you had? 

Candidly, last night I dreamt I was friends with Billie Eilish and we went to a Greenday show where they were covering music by my friend, Macy Rodman. I don’t know how this came about, but it did, and now I need it to come true!

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work? 

A hundred years from now, I would love to know that I played even a small part in creating the creative and dynamic fabric that makes up New York City. On a deeper level, I also hope that my life will be a great representation for trans people everywhere. When I’m older, if I can reach a fraction of the level of iconic-ness that some of the trans women have achieved whom I’ve looked up to since I was a kid, I will be happy!

Follow @Chiquitita on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

At Creatively, our mission is to champion creative talent and nurture a community that truly reflects the diversity across the full spectrum of the creative economy. As we mark Latinx Heritage Month, we’re proud to spotlight and celebrate the incredible creative contributions of the Latinx and Hispanic artists on Creatively.

If one could literally stretch one’s imagination, the result would look something like Felix Semper’s expandable paper sculptures. Semper is a Cuban-American artist and sculptor whose work has gained international recognition, finding its way into the collections of celebrities and global corporations such as A$AP Rocky, DJ Khaled, Kelly Ripa, Microsoft, and Adidas, among others.

While sculpture helped Semper make a name for himself, his work as a painter reveals a broad stylistic range, reflecting the aesthetics of art movements such as neo-expressionism, pop art and street art. In blending techniques and vibrant color palettes, Semper lends his subjects an undeniable sense of freedom and spontaneity.  

Semper’s process begins with him glueing hundreds of sheets of paper together before carving those connected layers into sneakers, handbags, food items, animals and celebrity busts. The resulting work invites viewers to experience sculpture in a new light, bringing a fluid, playful mobility to a traditionally rigid medium.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet visual artist, Felix Semper.

What is the first creative project you remember?

If I think back to my first project, it was when I was in elementary school. My friend and I did a one-minute hand drawn animated film for a school competition. For the project, we created a cartoon character that was hunting a rabbit. We ended up winning an award.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

I would say people are “wowed” when they see my work. Also, “surprising” and “happy” are emotions that come up. 

Semper creates jaw-dropping sculptures and portraits out of paper.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

The most fulfilling and one of the most public [collaborations] was with A$AP Rocky. He called me up to collaborate with him on his album. He wanted me to design and create sculptures for the cover, and even though the team decided to go in a different direction, the collaboration was fun to do! I love doing collaborations with other artists and being able to mix different mediums and different creative pieces together. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

The A$AP Rocky collaboration taught me to just be simple and straight on. I learned to be myself and not sugarcoat my creativity. 

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think creativity is something you’re born with. I think it’s like any gift you have, you have to build it. Any muscles you have, you work on them to get stronger. You have to work on your creativity. 

Semper shows how his intricate pieces are also interactive.

What’s the last dream you had?

My dream is to have a home in the Mediterranean with a workspace to create while being surrounded by visually appealing landscapes. I want to be able to enhance my creativity. 

Semper at work on a new piece.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

In 100 years from now, I hope people are still surprised and learn something from my work. I hope they will look at my work and say, “This is from 100 years ago, but it’s still fresh today.” 

Follow @FelixSemper on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

At Creatively, our mission is to champion creative talent and nurture a community that truly reflects the diversity across the full spectrum of the creative economy. As we mark Latinx Heritage Month, we’re proud to spotlight and celebrate the incredible creative contributions of the Latinx and Hispanic artists on Creatively, starting with Victoria Villasana.

If there’s a common thread unifying Villasana’s work, it’s the celebration of imperfection. Born in Guadalajara, Mexico, Villasana is known for embroidering photographs, embellishing her images with three-dimensional threads that dangle beyond the frame. Villasana splits her time between Mexico and England, continuing to hone her craft through installations, commissions, and collaborations around the world.

Using her artwork to bridge the gap between tradition and the avant-garde, Villasana’s drive to create is borne of an insatiable interest in history, culture, and the interrelations of people in a fragmented, post-digital world. Weaving stories onto her images in her surreal, unfinished aesthetic, she is able to express the resiliency and creativity of the human spirit and accent specific features of her subjects which include Nina Simone, Marylin Monroe, Mister Rogers, and Yayoi Kusama, among many others.  

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet visual artist, Victoria Villasana.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I remember doing a collaboration with a Spanish photographer and a Spanish street artist in the streets of London.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Colourful, storytelling, patterns.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I worked with a charity in New Zealand where I traveled for a month doing workshops for different communities around the country. I even gave a workshop in a jail. I met really wonderful people and it was an amazing experience.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I think most projects teach me to be myself, to not take things too seriously, to have fun.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I believe we are all creative, but we are creative in different ways. Humans are constantly creating things, it is part of our nature, the problem is that we are creators and destroyers at the same time, and it is up to us if we use our energy for destruction or creation.

What’s the last dream you had?

Every dream I have had in the last five years has come true. This is not to say that my life has been perfect; I experienced a lot of difficulties and pain in between, but overall, many of my dreams have come true and I am very grateful for that.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I really don’t know, but I hope people see a symbiosis of the paradoxes in the human experience: history and the future, tradition and defiance, solitude and belonging, the material and the sacred.

Follow @villana on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Championing creativity at New York’s big reopening.

This September, Creatively is celebrating the vibrant, diverse creatives in our community whose imagination, skill, and ambition make all of our lives brighter and more enjoyable. In just over a year, 200,000 creatives have joined Creatively to showcase their portfolios, connect with one another, and find jobs. More than 1,400 companies are now using the job platform for creatives to find creators for full-time and freelance jobs.

Starting this week, we’re bringing some of the most exciting artists on Creatively to the streets of New York City, cheering on the city’s big fall reopening with stunning works by Broadie, Amber Vittoria, Tyler Spangler, Mulan Fu, Adrien Saporiti, and Friend and Nemesis. Get a sneak peek at the campaign creative below, and follow these artists on Creatively to see more of their latest work.

What’s more, Creatively will pop up in secret locations all over the city during the much-anticipated return of New York Fashion Week. Follow along on Instagram @hellocreatively for all the details! 

Broadie

Broadie is a graphic artist from the Greater D.C. area who blends his skills in graphic design with his love of mixed media. His artwork of Stacey Abrams went viral during election season and took his following to new heights, as his work was shared by A-list celebrities and major platforms. Broadie challenges the boundaries of traditional mixed media art using square color schemes, along with various techniques that incorporate digital painting, vector, 3D, and photo-manipulations. He draws his inspiration from the richness of Black culture—the past, present and possibilities of the future. 

Follow Broadie on Creatively

Amber Vittoria

Amber Vittoria is an illustrator and painter based in New York City. Her work centers on the portrayal of women within art—featuring colorful illustrations that play with the idea of femininity and the feminine form, including overtly extended limbs and playfully rounded features. In a painting series called “How We Carry Ourselves,” for example, women are represented as colorful swirls of paint with little heads and feet, with titles like “Fancy for FaceTime” and “My Posture is Perfect.” Her creative style has earned her mint collaborators like NBC, Warby Parker, Gucci, The New York Times, and Instagram, as well as a nod from Forbes, which included her on its “30 Under 30” list in 2020. Vittoria’s recent work has taken a digital turn:  “I’ve been exploring the digital aspect of my works,” she says, “and how the bold, colorful lines in turn inform my paintings.”

Follow Amber Vittoria on Creatively

Tyler Spangler

Tyler Spangler is a digital artist based in Seattle, Washington. Through his work, he plays with color and animation, often interposing bright color with aged black and white photos to create an eye-catching, pop-meets-surreal effect. His dazzling work has won him an impressive roster of clients including Chanel, Instagram, Nike, and Starbucks. He describes his way of working as “a bit obsessive”; at one point, he created as many as 2,000 pieces in a single year. 

Follow Tyler Spangler on Creatively

Mulan Fu

Mulan Fu is an award-winning filmmaker, animator, and illustrator based in New York City. Her commercial work ranges from 2D animation, motion graphics, and illustration to animated production creative development. As a storyteller, Fu is intrigued by the visual richness of Chinese mythologies and the emotional depth of touching familial stories. She aims to explore and promote the Chinese cultural identity through charming and unique tales that have the potential to bridge cultural differences. Growing up in Asia and studying abroad in Europe and North America, she finds passion in discovering captivating stories along her travels and sharing them with the world through the magical medium of animation. Fu is currently “exploring interactive media and its combination with animated content” at her master’s program at Columbia University, as well as working in the Chinese feature animation industry as part of the development team at Pearl Studio (Abominable, Over the Moon). 

Follow Mulan Fu on Creatively

Adrien Saporiti

Adrien Saporiti is a Nashville native who currently splits his time between his hometown and Portland, Oregon. The son of a Vietnamese oil painter and a musician from South Boston, Saporiti believes his unique upbringing, coupled with growing up biracial in the American South, gives his work a distinct aesthetic and sense of storytelling. After graduating from the Berklee College of Music, Saporiti founded an apparel company and began creating street art around Nashville; most notably the now iconic, I BELIEVE IN NASHVILLE symbol. What’s Saporiti working on now? “I’m preparing for a show in Nashville in October, creating a collection that will be dropping in November, and working on getting a series of art prints and the second series of my ‘I Must Belong Somewhere’ prints ready to drop next month.”

Follow Adrien Saporiti on Creatively

Friend and Nemesis

Friend and Nemesis is a one-stop creative collective based in Philadelphia. The husband and wife duo, photographer Andreas Billig and designer Kristy Lee, embraced the idea of bringing their creative talents of photography, styling, and design into a common frame through shared mediums. Inspired by the circus and carnival fairs, the concept of different mediums working together was their anchor. The vision was to create a brand that would showcase personalities and characters with a candid and non-judgmental approach. The brand originated in London with a photo series, and they later launched Friend and Nemesis in Brooklyn with a collection of jewelry and accessories photographed in their narrative style. 

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Based in Los Angeles, Reiss is known for her public art installations and large-scale murals that have graced alleyways, abandoned buildings, forests, bookstores, and galleries around the world.

Growing up artsy in a quiet suburb of Colorado, Reiss never quite fit in. Her gut told her she was destined for something bigger, so she relocated to San Francisco in an era when the city was still a hub for guerilla art. There, she received her MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and spent almost two decades enjoying what she calls a “creative incubation,” quite literally painting the town with artists drawn to the same medium.

Influenced by her Eastern European heritage, Reiss puts a psychedelic twist on traditional Polish and Russian folk art. While murals make up the bulk of her work, she has also worked with textiles to create her signature installation experiences, while also deepening her practice on a much smaller scale with delicate paintings, sketches, and tattoo designs. There’s a certain adolescent innocence captured by her aesthetic which is juxtaposed by her technical virtuosity, allowing her to depict inviting scenes of flora and fauna in ways that can only be described as magical.  

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet muralist, Bunnie Reiss.

What is the first creative project you remember?

One of my very first public murals was in the amazing Clarion Alley. It was around 1999-2000, and things were fantastic in The Mission. So much creative force coming out of just a few blocks in San Francisco. It was an amazing time and I painted a very small wall that took me so many days. I laugh now when I think about how long it took. I wanted it to be perfect. I painted a huge portrait of a cat toy from the 1950s. It’s still one of my favorite murals. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Folk, psychedelic, cosmic.

Mural by Bunnie Reiss in Detroit, MI.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

My friends and I worked on a free carnival called Peralta Junction in Oakland, CA. We rented a vacant lot for 3 months and built a series of games, booths, stages, etc. I was in charge of the stage and it was incredible to make something so big and beautiful. It was one of the last projects our loose collective did before we sort of grew up and moved in different directions. It was by far one of the most ambitious, with so many hands and personalities involved. I loved it and still think of it often.  

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Getting my MFA in painting was one of the harder experiences I’ve had. I was very isolated and so busy with both studio and critical reading and writing. It taught me so many lessons, but most importantly how to defend my work and speak effectively in a way where I am actually heard. It was a great lesson in understanding myself, especially as a female in higher education. 

A bespoke buffalo and flowers mural by Bunnie Reiss that speaks to her Colorado roots.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think it’s a little bit of both. It just comes down to really doing what you want in this world and being honest about that work.

What’s the last dream you had?

I had a daydream about growing an orchard of olive trees on my desert property. I could almost feel the shade from them. I hope it becomes a reality. 

Big or small canvases, Reiss finds creative surfaces to bring her signature work to life.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I want to be remembered as a kind, honest woman who worked hard and loved the world.

Follow @Bunnie on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

You’re not dreaming—you’re just looking at one of Valentin Pavageau’s hypnotic compositions that blend illustration and graphic design into mesmerizing digital renderings.

Pavageau studied art at Atelier Guist’hau-Rollin in Nantes, France, an education that easily could have pushed him towards a more traditional aesthetic. Instead, he drew inspiration from the canonical figures he studied—surrealists such as Salvador Dalí, for example—then leveraged these influences as a jumping off point from which to push the boundaries of distortion, defining a style all his own.

Pavageau’s digital collages are filled with bold geometric patterns and vibrant color schemes that play with perspective and guide the eye. His emphasis on lighting along with the addition of an occasional, solitary character lends each piece a narrative, a nod to his fascination with film. By incorporating intense, repetitive lines and shadows, Pavageau creates an illusion of movement, stimulating a seductively dizzying experience for the viewer—a trance you’ll never want to snap out of. 

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet Valentin Pavageau.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I think it was a small series of adventurous comic books I started to draw when I was five (full of adventure and sci-fi, if I remember well). The story centered around a character named Lapa, which can be translated as “no have.” This amused my parents because he didn’t possess a nose nor ears, but this was a pure coincidence: a plain smiley face was just way more convenient to draw. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Minimalistic, surrealistic, psychedelic.

‘Panorama’ by Valentin Pavageau.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

A quite recent one where I had to create a poster for an upcoming VR show. It had to be one image that summed up different scenes, different stories. It was a bit of a challenge as I usually try to focus on one central element and keep my pieces as minimalistic as possible, but it was a great experience.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I can’t think of one in particular, but I’d say every commissioned work that has unusual constraints teaches me something new or takes me out of my comfort zone. Every project teaches me that I tend to underestimate the time I need to reach what I want… 

‘Traffic Light’ by Valentin Pavageau.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I’d say I was born with it, but like many other fields, it still requires a lot of practice. I had periods of time, sometimes years, when I didn’t create anything, and I felt my appetite and skills almost disappear. I believe it is important to practice your craft on a regular basis to keep the mind fresh and open to new influences. Emulation can have great effects, too. 

‘Mausoleum’ by Valentim Pavageau.

What’s the last dream you had?

I had a bunch of weird dreams recently. In one, my roommate, who has been taking drawing lessons in real life, came home with countless incredible new pieces of art and I was really jealous. I don’t know what a psychoanalyst would do with this, but I don’t want to know. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

If there’s any trace at all of my work in a hundred years, I would be glad! And more specifically, I hope it stands the test of time and remains mysterious and evocative.

Follow @ValentinPavageau on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Bigger isn’t always better, but standing beside one of Belgium native Michael Benisty’s gigantic, metal-cast sculptures, one starts to wonder whether it might be. 

Each of Benisty’s sculptures begins with a 3D rendering that allows him to further develop the imaginative world in which each sculpture exists and expand the possibilities of how his work can be shared. Benisty’s sculptures and digital works explore themes of submission, romance, and enlightenment. His artistic goal is to encourage a dialogue among viewers, to incite a response, and above all else, to promote self-discovery. 

On a technical level, Benisty brings an exquisite softness to his enormous, stainless steel figures, like the delicately draped fabric that envelops his 21-foot masterpiece, “Surrender,” or the windswept cords that form “Agaue,” a 16-foot gold-plated face. With his most recognizable creations measuring in at these larger-than-life dimensions, Benisty strives to create art that will not only make you look up, but more importantly, look inward.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

“Surrender,” a 21-foot stainless steel piece by Benisty. 

What is the first creative project you remember?

It is difficult to remember the very first creative project since I have been on a creative journey for the past 25 years. But the first that comes to mind when looking back was my first digital art series I created to awaken and provoke a questioning of the world’s current state of affairs. I focused on international, social, and political issues that I witnessed while traveling extensively around the world, a series that juxtaposed images of East and West, military might and spirituality, power and hopelessness.   

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

My aesthetic has evolved over time throughout the evolution of my work, tapping into different mediums and themes, refining itself over time to where it’s at now. If I could describe it in three words, it would be meaningful, beautiful, and experimental.

“Broken But Together” is a 21-foot sculpture made of mirror polished stainless steel, created by Michael Benisty. 

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Each new collaboration presents different challenges, but my first large-scale sculpture in collaboration with Swarovski was a very fulfilling experience for me as I learned a lot along the way. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Each new project teaches me something new about myself. 

“Agaue,” a 16-foot gold plated polished stainless steel piece by Benisty.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think we all have creativity in us, but it definitely takes time and effort to mold your vision. 

What’s the last dream you had?

The last dream I had is the one I am currently working on building. 

“Mirage” is a 16-foot sculpture created by Michael Benisty. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I cannot think that far ahead, but what I have experienced over the course of my career is that art is built only to be shared. And the real reward, to me, lies in the experience that others live through and share with me.

Follow @MichaelBenisty on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

It’s the early 2000s in Brooklyn, New York and teenage Tyra Myricks is locked in her room, grounded for sneaking off to purchase designer clothes. Instead of wasting any time considering what she’d done wrong, she decides to pour her creative energy into dreaming up her own clothing line. Fast forward a decade, and Myricks had launched WEALTH (formerly known as FLIGHT NYC), a streetwear brand sported by celebrities around the globe.

As the daughter of Run DMC’s Jam Master Jay, Myricks grew up immersed in the music industry—an upbringing that shaped her career at the intersection of music and fashion. As the former Director of Design and Merchandising & Development at OVO, rapper Drake’s lifestyle brand, Myricks curated designs for all stores in North America, Canada, England and Japan, while also managing tour merchandise for artists PartyNextDoor, DVSN, and Drake himself.

Some of Myricks’ other business ventures include co-founding Method Gym, the first Black-owned gym in downtown Los Angeles, and Juicy Pizza, an L.A eatery commemorating Biggie Smalls in partnership with his daughter, T’yanna Wallace. Between projects, Myricks pursues her passion for giving back, creating opportunities for Black creatives by providing resources to help grow minority-owned businesses. In addition, Myricks is the co-founder of EntreprHERneur, a platform that focuses on the mental health of female entrepreneurs, shining a light on the obstacles faced by women in business, and creating a space for them to succeed. That’s how she stays grounded, which if you ask us, beats being grounded any day.

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet Tyra Myricks, serial entrepreneur and designer.

What is the first creative project you remember?

My creative projects go back to grade school. I didn’t want anyone else in class to be smarter or more creative than I was, so I went above and beyond. In fourth grade, we had to give an oral presentation on a Native American tribe of our choice. I made headdresses for my entire group out of feathers and construction paper and our group got over 100%. That wasn’t the first time I was creative on a school project, but it’s the first time I initiated something when it wasn’t a part of the instructions. I felt like a trendsetter, an overachiever, and it felt amazing. I wanted to feel that feeling so much more in life.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Comfortable, unparalleled, thought-provoking.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

The most fulfilling collaboration I have worked on is OVO x BAPE. BAPE has always been one of my favorite brands. In high school, I would actually get in trouble for sneaking to the BAPE store and buying things several times a week. When I got caught, my mother grounded me, but she also asked me, “Why do you pay so much for designer when people can pay you to wear your name? You hustling backwards and most of those brands don’t care about people that look like us.” I started my clothing line while on punishment with those words ringing in my head as I stared at my bedroom walls after school. So, to go from BAPE being one of the reasons I started my brand to working on a collaboration with them was super fulfilling. 

OHGEESY for OVO x BAPE campaign.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Each project teaches me something different. Whether it’s something simple like discovering my range or something as minuscule as being able to stay up and function for 72 hours without sleep and still meet a deadline with an impeccable finished product. Life is our greatest teacher, and when you spend your life executing your passion, you constantly learn new things about yourself. It’s all about slowing down momentarily to see the lesson or your abilities you weren’t aware of. 

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I believe creativity is hereditary. Both of my parents were extremely creative, however if I hadn’t been encouraged to express myself creatively as a child, I don’t think I would be where I am today. Creativity is in us all, something or someone just has to bring it out of us. 

Behind the scenes with Tyra Myricks.

What’s the last dream you had?

The last dream I had was a nightmare: I got caught cheating. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I know it’s sort of inevitable but I don’t want my work to be written about. Stories get misconstrued, misinterpreted, and watered down with time. I want my work, projects, businesses and legacy to speak for itself on a Banksy, Basquiat, Picasso, Dalí level, but digitally. When we see an artist we know their story without reading a book. Don’t put my story on pages, recreate it in murals, album covers, concert sets, reuse and recycle pieces of my story to create infinite art and creativity.

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Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

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For distinguished guests, we like to roll out the red carpet. For textile artist Trish Andersen, it’s more fitting to roll out one of the intricately textured, multicolored, kaleidoscopic creations she’s famous for. Hailing from Dalton, Georgia, the so-called “carpet capital of the world,” Andersen—armed with a tufting gun, which allows her to paint with yarn—creates enticingly plush pieces that tempt you to toss etiquette to the wind and touch the art.

Upon graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design, Andersen spent a decade working in Brooklyn, where she ran a studio that fabricated custom environments for events and photoshoots. In search of a change of pace and a more authentic version of herself, she landed back in Savannah, Georgia, shifting away from commercial work in order to develop her personal artistic practice and reconnect with her roots. Enter the tufting gun.

When creating, Andersen reaches for fibers gathered from flora, fauna, and the factory floor to strike her unique balance between ordered and anarchic, vibrant and muted. Energized by color, her palettes are born out of spontaneity, while her intertwining designs are often planned using programs like Procreate. By playing with pile heights and cutting techniques, Andersen brings her splashy aesthetic to everything from large-scale wall art to sculptures and installations, and even directly into your home with her signature rugs and shag mats. 

You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

Meet textile artist, Trish Andersen.

What is the first creative project you remember?

I was diagnosed with Leukemia when I was two years old. My first memory of making/creating was at the clinic. It’s no wonder why I still create to heal and process the world around me!

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Colorful, textured, soft.

Ebb and Flow by Trish Andersen.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

There have been many, but I would have to say a large scale piece I did for the lobby of the Peeples Cancer Institute. It was very cool to be able to create something that could help people go through something I too have experienced. 

Another would be my rug collaboration with Shaw Contract rugs; after all, I grew up in the carpet capital of the world. No matter where I was in the country, whenever I’d see a Shaw carpet truck driving down the highway it would remind me of home. I had no clue my life would circle back to a focus on yarn and carpet making. It was a real honor to get to work with this incredible company. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

I was commissioned to create a piece for the launch of Coca-Cola’s new flavor, Georgia Peach. They were looking to commission an artist from Georgia, and that’s where I grew up. When I received the call, I was actually driving down the highway in a box truck, moving my studio from NYC to Georgia. Only moments prior to the call, I was thinking about how crazy I was for making such a move. It was the sign I needed and reminded me to trust my gut and trust the process.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think everyone is creative. I see creativity as problem solving, and that can be done in so many different ways.

Connection Reflection by Trish Andersen.

What’s the last dream you had?

I’m constantly having dreams where I discover there’s a whole new wing of my house or studio. I’m always so excited in the dream, but a little defeated when I wake up.

A behind the scenes look at Trish Andersen’s studio.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

Ha! I’d be shocked if they are still talking about it. But I guess, “looks like she had fun!”

Follow @TrishAndersen on Creatively

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life