Tyler Spangler

Tyler Spangler is a digital artist based in Seattle whose work plays with color and animation, often interposing bright color with aged black and white photos to create an eye-catching, pop-meets-surreal effect. 

A former psychology student, Spangler’s digital collage work has won him an impressive roster of clients including Chanel, Instagram, Nike, and Starbucks.

He describes his way of working as “a bit obsessive”: at one point, he created as many as 2,000 pieces in a single year, and has created five 440-page books filled with his own designs. Check out Spangler’s latest projects on Creatively here.

What is the first creative project you remember?

My first creative project was when my friend let me draw on his surfboard. I used to draw on my surfboards in my garage with paint pens and bright colors. Eventually, all my friends would want me to draw on their surfboards. That encouraged me to believe other people liked my art and put an emphasis that there is something here to explore.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Bubblegum. Curious. Nervous.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I would say my most fulfilling collaboration was with Coach. I thought it was cool because it was two worlds coming together. If I listed brands I want to work with, Coach wouldn’t have necessarily been at the top because I always work with skate and surf brands and have a punk rock edge, but to work with a fashion company where my mom had their purses was amazing.

Spangler was commissioned by Coach to create a typographic design and pattern based on the Coach monogram. The pattern was used in Coach retail stores, as well as on a variety of handbags.

The coolest part was taking my grandma into a Coach store at a nearby mall. She’d go up to everyone there and say: “Did you know my grandson designed this wallpaper?” To see my grandma so proud was really important to me. She thought I was famous!

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

When I had to do figure drawing in art school, I was absolutely terrible at it. Somehow, all my models looked exactly the same. It was really discouraging looking at everyone’s pieces and to see everyone else’s figure drawings be meticulously crafted. 

I’m not great at realistic interpretations, which is why I prefer working digitally. There’s less of a messy trail and it’s more straightforward. This experience taught me that you don’t have to be good at everything—or the traditional things teachers tell you in school to be good at—to become an artist. You don’t have to be good at multiple things. You can find one thing and be really good at it and go all in.

Spangler created six typographic artworks for Instagram to encourage people to vote in the 2020 presidential election.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think it’s a little bit of both. In psychology, everything is nature vs. nurture, genes vs. environment. Kids are always born curious and then through whatever path or environment, it either squashes that curiosity or encourages it. I have a four-year-old son and I always try to ask him: “What do you think?”

What’s the last dream you had?

I had a dream that I was getting shipped off somewhere to die––it was an ominous presence. In the dream, I’m being transported to this mysterious place with mysterious means to cease to exist. I woke up and I was like “Oh, I’m still here.” Maybe it’s my soul dying from the election. [Laughs]

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

“It made me smile.”

Follow @TylerSpangler on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Neffi Walker

Neffi Walker is an interior designer based in New Jersey who believes a beautiful life is one designed with intention. The founder and principal designer of The Black Home, Walker uses dark tones as the focal point in many of her designs—often accentuating black walls with pops of color or opulent gold mirrors. It’s a bold design approach that has won her accolades in Essence, Blavity, Domino, Elle Decor, Apartment Therapy, and more.

As a business owner and a mother of five, Walker is bridging the gap between family, creativity, and business—and her mission to highlight overlooked or undervalued beauties is mirrored in the way she approaches design. Check out her latest projects on Creatively here.

What is the first creative project you remember? 

The first creative project I remember was creating a washing machine out of cardboard at the age of eight. I lined the insides with garbage bags and had the audacity to add water and soap while my younger sister stood inside and turned around, stomping her feet, “washing” for what seemed to be an hour. I remember water everywhere, and when my mother realized what I’d done, she was happy that I took the initiative to try in the first place.

Describe your aesthetic in your 3 words.

All. Black. Everything. 

What has been the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on? 

I created comfortable environments for mothers and children in a family homeless shelter so they can feel as though their transitional space was still a home.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself? 

I once had a client who tested my every nerve. She did it with everyone so it wasn’t taken personally, but I realized my patience is a superpower and used to my benefit which helps move situations with love and ease.

Do you think creativity is something we’re born with or taught? 

Both. I feel as though my eye and intuition for how something should make you feel has lead me through career and life as well I also applaud those who learn the details through schooling and execute them to create amazing works of art.

What’s the last dream you had?

I had a dream I was cooking lamb chops. I love a lamb chop!

100 years from now, what do you hope people will write about you/your work? 

I want them to write: She was intentional with her design and she did it all for the culture. 

Follow @NeffiWalker on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Melanie Dunea

Melanie Dunea is an award-winning photographer and author based in New York City, who is best known for the book series My Last Supper, as well as her revealing photographs portraits of some of the world’s most celebrated artists, chefs, public figures and tastemakers. politicians and intellectuals. Dunea has established herself as a premier portraitist, covering a wide variety of subjects—from Taylor Swift and Tony Bennett to Anthony Bourdain and Misty Copeland.

Dunea’s most recent projects are two limited-edition scarf collections, titled ‘New York in Bloom’ and ‘Dream,’ based on her photography. (Both collections are available exclusively at [her online shop].) You can check out her latest projects on Creatively [here].

What is the first creative project you remember?

When I was about five years old, I used my Holly Hobbie cartoon sewing machine to make underpants for children who were less fortunate than me. (I imagined that if they were without food, that they must also be without underpants, and this preoccupied my child mind.) I remember my mother and I wrapping the packages in brown paper and mailing them off. The world should thank me for not pursuing a career in fashion. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Simple. Classic. Fun.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

That’s tough because one way or another, I learn from each collaboration. Pushed to pick, it would be one of the latest commissions for Frenchette Bakery in lower Manhattan. The assignment came with a small list of “must have” shots and the rest was up to me. I amused myself creating lots of different shapes and images with the baked goods and breads. 

A portrait of Chef Daniel Boulud by Melanie Dunea.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Every shoot reminds me to thoroughly prepare for things to not go as you planned them. Over the years I’ve built up my ability to pivot on the spot.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

That’s a tough one. Curiosity and creativity go hand in hand, but you can absolutely cultivate it. Dream and try. Stretch. 30 years into my career and I decided to try creating wearable art from my work. It can be done!

One of Melanie Dunea’s limited-edition scarves, titled ‘Twilight,’ from the Dream Collection.

What’s the last dream you had?

Hmm … I am sure it had to do with chocolate. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

Melanie worked hard to stay out of the picture and was successful in documenting what she saw.

Follow @MelanieDunea on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Clare Vivier 

While working as a journalist for French television in 2003, Clare Vivier found that she simply could not find a stylish bag for all the work essentials—including a laptop—that she was carrying around. And so she made her own. The rest, as they say, is history: after making bags for her friends, a store in Los Angeles placed an initial order, and a handbag empire was born.

Since founding Clare V. in 2008, Vivier has opened eight retail stores and developed a signature aesthetic that’s been adopted by celebrities and influencers alike. Equal parts LA cool-girl and Parisian sophisticate, Clare V.’s bags and accessories evoke a certain spirited je ne sais quoi that’s both cheeky and polished. Vivier has made collaborations a major part of her business, working with brands & artists including Melissa McCarthy, artist Donald Robertson, Mike D., Adam Scott, and more; and supports an ongoing partnerships with Every Mother Counts, When We All Vote, I AM A VOTER., Everytown for Gun Safety, and Planned Parenthood. Check out Clare V.’s latest projects on Creatively here

What is the first creative project you remember? 

The first creative project I remember that led to my professional path was when I started making laptop bags. That’s how I started the company. I had the vision of creating a laptop bag which led to the creation of a work bag company. I remember going out to find the perfect foam lining and the perfect canvas and sewing it myself. I believe there was a hole in the market for cute work bags for women and was passionate about making it happen.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Chic. Colorful. Laid-back. 

Designer Clare Vivier, photographed by Katrina Dickson.

What has been the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on? 

We’ve worked with so many incredible people. I would say the collaboration with Mike D. from the Beastie Boys remains at the top of the list because it was working with someone in the music industry. Our company is mostly female, so working with a guy and to have that perspective to work from a creative person from another creative industry and the synergy and the way we brought the collection to life was incredible. We were able to launch both collaborations with him in Paris with two really fun dance parties. I think it was a really great way to showcase the two creative forces coming together. 

Clare V. and Mike D.’s collaborative capsule collection in 2016.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself? 

One thing that I am really proud of was when we sold our laptop cases out of a room in my house to the Apple Store. It was really a groundbreaking moment for me. It was a very big order. But the day we were shipping, we ran into a hiccup. There was an issue with how it was shipped where Apple almost refused the order.

I had so much tenacity that I got on the phone with them. I told them we worked so hard to get this order and how big of a deal it was to me and that they must accept this order. 

It just showed me the strength, belief, and tenaciousness that I think is so necessary for having your own company for as long as I have. 

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think it’s something you gotta be born with, but I think everyone is born with it. It’s about how we foster it. We’re all creative beings to some extent.

What’s the last dream you had?

I work with my niece, Franny, who is our model, social media manager, and one of our muses. I had a dream this morning where I thought she had left a curling iron on and it became a stressful situation where it felt like there were such grave implications from a curling iron. I haven’t told her yet!

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I hope they write that I was a brand that so many women and people loved because it made people feel good. That [we] brought a sense of joy and happiness to them. And also that I was a true proponent of labor [rights] in the United States. I hope they will talk about how we created many jobs for Americans. 

Follow @ShopClareV on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Accidentally Wes Anderson’s Wally Koval

Wally Koval was working as a product marketing director in New York when he started an Instagram account in 2017 called “Accidentally Wes Anderson.” Originally conceived as a kind of travel bucket list with his wife, Amanda, the profile—which serves as an homage to director Wes Anderson’s distinctive fanciful, nostalgic, always-symmetrical visual aesthetic—quickly went viral.

Now, Koval and his wife curate and publish daily content for more than a million followers (or “Adventurers”), a community that includes more than a few professional and novice photographers (or “Explorers”). (Every Koval and his wife receive thousands of submissions for AWA.) Koval recently even published a book spotlighting more than 200 idiosyncratic locations, including the stories behind each one. You can check out Korval’s projects on Creatively here.

What is the first creative project you remember?

In the eighth grade, I created a sculpture that was submitted to a state-wide contest. I won $100! I was super pumped and at the time, I felt like I had won the lottery. The sculpture still sits in a case in my parents’ basement.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Community-oriented––with a capital ‘C’. Symmetrical. Subjective.

I say “subjective” because we post one photo a day, 30 photos a month—even though we receive over 3,000 submissions a month. We look at every single one and even if a photo is not ultimately chosen, every single one resonated [as ‘Accidentally Wes Anderson’ with the member of the Community who sent it our way, and that is what makes it so special].

Image captured in Lisbon by an AWA Explorer, Jack Spicer Adams.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Accidentally Wes Anderson, The Book––by far. Yes, Wes Anderson wrote the foreword, but from a collaboration perspective––just to make this book, it took the collaborative effort of 180 photographers from 50+ different countries. 

Accidentally Wes Anderson, the book, including a foreword by Wes Anderson himself. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Not to be repetitive, but the book––by far. This was a two-and-a-half-year project. I’ve posted on IG on @accidentallywesanderson once a day, every single day, for three and a half years. I’ve posted on the day of weddings and funerals, in dentist chairs, and beyond. Outside of brushing my teeth, I’ve never been consistent with anything else like this in my entire life. It’s hard work, but it doesn’t feel like work. I know it sounds cheesy, but our community creates a level of excitement that Amanda and I [likely] would have lost.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think it’s half and half. I think there are certain people who are innately more skilled at forming or creating pieces but I definitely believe part of this can be learned. There is something that you have inside of you that activates once you’re interested in something creative. 

What’s the last dream you had?

[Laughs] I got nothing. I don’t even know what I’ve had for lunch!

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

In 100 years, I hope that people say Accidentally Wes Anderson has influenced someone at some level to find some peace and positivity in the world and some level of excitement or engagement that spurred someone else to explore something new. Even if it was a new idea or a new reason to get off the couch and go down Main Street––or perhaps look behind a door that they wouldn’t have looked behind before. Even if it isn’t a mention of my project or my name, I hope that it creates a butterfly effect.

Follow @Accidentally Wes Anderson on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Diego Montoya

Diego Montoya is a visual artist and fashion designer whose meticulously handcrafted, fantastical creations have won him legions of fans—from Lady Gaga to the stars of “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” Born in Peru and raised in Miami, Montoya’s early creative influences ran the gamut from John Galliano and Alexander McQueen to Princess Diana’s wedding dress. As a teenager in Miami, he started attending drag shows, and after studying fashion design in school, he moved to New York City to develop his own over-the-top sensibility.

Today, Montoya’s wearable works of art have been worn by everyone from Sasha Velour and Bob the Drag Queen to Jennifer Lewis on the Oscars red carpet. You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here.

What is the first creative project you remember?

In my early New York days, I would design large scale immersive art installations in raw spaces (mostly empty warehouses) for an experimental queer art festival. It was an annual project that I did for six years. The festival was like a pop-up world that lasted a week, but the build was about a month long and took dozens of volunteers to accomplish. It was one of the most challenging and rewarding projects I have worked on. 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Playful. Intricate. Dramatic.

A Diego Montoya headpiece and mask, photographed by Stone Zhu. 


What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

My most fulfilling collaboration has got to be with Sasha Velour. We have been working together for the past four years and I have grown so much as an artist because of it. 

Visual artist and drag queen Sasha Velour wearing custom Diego Montoya for NYC Pride 2018. Photographed by Tanner Abel. 

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

During my early art builds and installations, a mentor taught me that the best leaders develop new leaders. I learned to listen to my team and encourage them to push their talents. This really influenced the way I would approach leadership and the way I run my company today. 

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think you are born with creativity but you must push yourself to learn the skills to support it.

What’s the last dream you had?

The other day I found my 2016 vision board—I used to make them every year. My big dream was to make my art my primary income, start my company and move on from doing random freelance gigs that were not in my field. This seemed so distant at the time and it was so nice to be reading those intentions now and realize that not only had I built a company based on my work, but I now was able to hire a team and open a studio. 2016 me would be so proud. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

Every piece we make is handmade and very labor intensive. I hope that people can see the love that goes into every piece and not only appreciate the craftsmanship but the intention that goes into the process.  

Follow @DiegoMontoya on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Danielle Priano

Danielle Priano, one of the incredible leaders participating in next week’s Creatively Classes series, is a celebrity and editorial hairstylist based in New York City. Her energy and talent has made her one of fashion’s most sought-after names, allowing her to work with some of the world’s top talent and brands, including Cara Delevingne, Hailey Bieber, Adriana Lima, Gigi and Bella Hadid, Vanessa Hudgens, Ariana Grande, Chrissy Teigen, Lily Aldridge, and more.


An entrepreneur at heart, Danielle and her sister Michelle co-founded PSxDanielle, a line of expertly-designed hair products, after being frustrated with some of the hair tools and accessories they’d been using. You can check out their latest projects on Creatively here, and register for Priano’s class on Creatively here!

What is the first creative project you remember?

My first creative project was getting called for an editorial with W Magazine while I was still working as an assistant.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Sexy. Modern. Snatched. 

Celebrity hairstylist Danielle Priano.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

The most fulfilling collaboration that I worked on was a movie that I did with Jennifer Lopez [called “Marry Me”] (coming February 2021). I learned so much about that part of the industry and I grew energetically during the movie.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

The one creative project that I did that taught me something fundamentally was a reality show with Mariah Carey called Mariah’s World. It taught me to control my emotions and go into everything more positively. 

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I fully believe that you’re born with creativity. Do I think it’s possible to be taught it? I guess under the right mentor, but you have to have the type of a brain and mindset to work like an artist.

Model Stella Maxwell, styled by Danielle Priano.

What’s the last dream you had?

In the last dream I had, I was helping a stranger get out of a really uncomfortable situation and bring her to safety.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

Well, hopefully I’m still here in 100 years … but if I’m not, I would like people to write that not only was I technically a great hairdresser, but that my energy and my drive was inspiring to other young hairdressers. 

Follow @PSxDanielle on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Yuya Parker

Photographer Yuya Parker has never approached photography as a means to capture the world around him as it currently exists. Rather, he insists he sees photography more like painting: “a tool to create the images [he] imagines.”

The resulting images—primarily still-life, including impeccably styled food vignettes—are bright, playful, and imaginative. Parker’s “Food as Contemporary Art” series was featured in American Photo Magazine, and his particular style has won him clients like Airbnb, Skinceuticals, Aetna, Baccarat, and Jamba.

Born in a small Japanese town, Parker is now based in both Los Angeles and Tokyo, and you can find his latest projects on Creatively here.

What is the first creative project you remember?

My grandmother was a teacher of Japanese calligraphy and instead of practicing letters, I was drawing with the ink.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

 Fresh. Joyful. Positive.

A Yuya Parker photograph inspired by vegan desserts and doughnuts.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

I created a film version of my photography series “Food as Contemporary Art” with a director friend and I was amazed by the new perspectives someone else’s creativity can bring to a project.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

When I was working on “Food as Contemporary Art,” I did not intend to make it to a series. I was simply having fun with an idea. Getting positive feedback from it gave me confidence and made me realize it’s okay to just have fun with creative concepts no matter how they may fit into your body of work.

An homage to Japanese ginger by Yuya Parker.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think we all have creativity we’re born with, but oftentimes we don’t know we have it. I don’t think someone can teach you how to be creative, but someone can help you realize what sparks your creativity.

What’s the last dream you had?

Running around a park with a very special cat who passed away last year and making sure he was hydrated.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I don’t know what I hope they will write, but if I can make them smile with my work for a second, that would be wonderful.

Follow @YuyaParker on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Gregg Renfrew

Gregg Renfrew is the founder and CEO of Beautycounter, a leading clean beauty and skincare company which she started in 2011. With a mission to get safer products into the hands of everyone, Beautycounter’s Never List bans over 1,800 questionable ingredients from their product formulations, and they advocate tirelessly for safer industry regulations. Why? Because they believe beauty should be good for you.

 Before launching Beautycounter, Renfrew established herself as a retail leader: she sold her successful bridal registry company, The Wedding List, to Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia in 2001. Since Beautycounter’s inception, Renfrew has spoken at Vanity Fair’s Founders Fair, Fortune’s Most Powerful Women, the NextGen Summit, and more. And Beautycounter has earned serious industry accolades—named one of Fast Company‘s Most Innovative Companies, WWD‘s Best-Performing Beauty Company in 2019, and CEW’s 2019 Indie Brand of the Year. You can check out Beautycounter’s latest projects and be the first to know about job opportunities on Creatively here.

What is the first creative project you remember?

At the beginning of my career, I started my own bridesmaid dress company, so I had to learn how to design and manufacture dresses—something I had never done before. 

Gregg Renfrew, founder and CEO of Beautycounter.

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Classic. Timeless…with a twist 😉

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Working with the state of California to pass cosmetic reform.

Beautycounter’s best-selling “Beyond Gloss” lip gloss.

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

Working with Susie Hilfiger at Best & Co., I learned how to work with creatives in a way that was constructive and not critical. Since then, I have been much more successful utilizing creative to drive business outcomes. 

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

Both. 

What’s the last dream you had?

That I was floating in the Mediterranean without a mask on. 

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

That my work made a difference in the lives of many people, and that it impacted the beauty industry for generations to come.

Follow @Beautycounter on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life

Chuck Amos

Chuck Amos is a celebrity hairstylist based in New York whose flair for “big and fantastical” hair has earned him clients like Alicia Keys, Solange Knowles, Taraji P. Henson, Tracee Ellis Ross, and more. (He styled Beyonce’s hair for the cover of her solo debut album, “Dangerously in Love.”)

Before moving to New York and enrolling at FIT, Amos was a young kid in Massachusetts, creating hairstyles with his cousin’s Barbie dolls. Hair was truly his calling, and now he’s equally committed to spreading love: “There’s nothing that I’m going to do that is going to change the world in hair,” he told Yahoo in an interview, “But you can change the way the world thinks, one thought at a time.” You can check out his latest projects on Creatively here.

What is the first creative project you remember?

The first creative project I remember was one for Bernadette Corporation, a clothing design company. During a shoot, their creative team requested modern-day ‘90s hairstyles mixed with old-school ‘80s hip-hop breakdancing urban-styled hair. Imagine: ‘90s finger waves mixed with MC Lyte/Salt-N-Pepa hair! 

Describe your aesthetic in three words.

Big. Textured. Fantastical. 

A fashion editorial shoot; hair styled by Chuck Amos, photographed by Mike Ruiz.

What was the most fulfilling collaboration you’ve worked on?

Any shoot I’ve ever worked on with the photographer Ruven Afanador. The collaboration of his artistic eye and my creative mind and execution made a beautiful marriage between art and fashion. My editorials with him were out of this world!

What’s one creative project that taught you something fundamental about yourself?

In the past, I always used a lot of “hair controlling” products like heavy hair sprays and gels to keep hair controlled. It was my comfort zone while on set; but recently, a beauty photographer told me to “just let the hair flow and move around naturally––the imperfections are the Art.” 

It made me very nervous to not be entirely in control of the hair itself, but after trying this new tactic, I understood the importance of being less of a perfectionist and instead trusting my craft and understanding that things come naturally. The beauty is in the natural flow of things, not only the things that I can control! Such a game changer––not just with my craft, but with my personal self and emotions. 

From the ISSEY Miyake anniversary book; hair styled by Chuck Amos, photographed by Ruven Afanador.

Do you think creativity is something you’re born with, or something you’re taught?

I think you’re born with an imagination but it’s important to harness that passion toward something. It’s important to be around the right people who can awaken that. You can learn to bring your imagination into the creativity of the job or industry or project that you are working on. There’s a fine line between nature and nurture.

What’s the last dream you had?

Actually, a few nights ago, I dreamt I was going up an extremely tall building in Brooklyn that was all white in a futuristic glass elevator (like “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory”). It went so high that I saw all of New York City and flying cars, so it was the future––and I went all the way up into the sky. That’s all I can remember.

One hundred years from now, what do you hope people write about your work?

I’ve gotten a lot of jobs and opportunities to work with large white corporations and clients that would normally not hire a Black hairstylist. I helped to break down doors in the ‘90s. Many Black hairstylists of this new generation have come to me and let me know that I inspired them to move forward and push to work all textured hair jobs, with all races. 

I hope my legacy tells people that there is a place for them in all situations. I had no idea that I had become a “role model” for them––and that makes me so proud of my work as well!

Follow @ChuckAmos on Creatively.

Creatively is more than a platform—we’re a creative collective. 

Questions or feedback? Email us at feedback@creatively.life